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Authors Reading Books Education Life-Long Learning Pete Springer Podcast TTT

Season 4 Episode 29: Pete Springer Reading “They Call Me Mom”

Welcome to Tea Toast and Trivia.

Thank you for listening in.

I am your host, Rebecca Budd, and I am looking forward to sharing this moment with you.

Pete Springer Passionate Teacher and Future Children’s Author

Bookstores, libraries, and coffee shops are great places for book readings. There is something extraordinary about hearing the voice of an author reading their stories. Their voice and intonation are nuanced by the many hours of effort putting pen to paper.  They created the characters, structured the plot, and lived every twist and turn that creates bumps in the storyline. 

Public libraries and bookstores have expanded their reach into a global community. Book readings have gone virtual.  We are learning to embrace technology in new ways.  Welcome the podcast series, “Authors Reading their Books”, which brings authors and their books from across the world to your home.  I invite you to put the kettle on and join the conversation on Tea Toast & Trivia.

I am thrilled to introduce Pete Springer who has graciously agreed to be our guest author reading from his book, They Call Me Mom. Pete is a former elementary school teacher (grades 2-6) in Eureka, California.  He said that he retired in 2016, but from what I have read, he is far from retired.  His passion will always lie with supporting education, kids, and teachers, which is demonstrated by his dedication to lifelong learning.

Thank you for joining Pete Springer and me on Tea Toast & Trivia. Authors reading their Books.

And a special thank you, Pete , for giving us insight into They Call Me Mom. You have inspired me, and I know that you have inspired readers and listeners to embrace a creative journey.

I invite you to meet up with Pete on his blog, Pete Springer, Amazon and Goodreads. It is a place that celebrates the joy of learning.

Until next time, dear friends, stay safe, be well.

Pete Springer Reading “They Call Me Mom” Tea. Toast. & Trivia.

By Rebecca Budd

Blogger, Visual Storyteller, Podcaster, Traveler and Life-long Learner

36 replies on “Season 4 Episode 29: Pete Springer Reading “They Call Me Mom””

I thoroughly enjoyed Pete’s discussion and the readings from his book. So much resonated with me. I wish the young people I taught in college writing courses had had him as a teacher. I ended up spending a great deal of time trying to convince them that the whole reason I was teaching them how to write effectively was that they had something important to say that other people wanted and/or needed to hear.

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How very well said, Liz! We write to share knowledge and experience. Each voice has a place in the diverse tapestry/narrative of humanity. We treasure those paintings on the cave walls because it reminds us that others that came before us, had something important to say. Pete is an extraordinary teacher! And so are you!!!

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Excellent example, Rebecca. Humans have been teaching and telling stories through pictures and language forever. I wonder if the people from that period had any idea how much their work would be scrutinized for centuries.

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I appreciate your approach, Liz. Students have to see the value in something before they fully buy in. I’ve come to embrace creative writing later in life and see it as a different way to connect with young people. One of the most common pieces of advice for writers is to “write what you know.” I know middle-grade kids, what makes them tick, and how they think. It’s a natural progression for me to write for the age I know.

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Thank you, Pete. As the years went by, it became increasingly difficult to overcome the “what do I have to do to get an A.” A real shame because the students were the ones missing out on developing a vital skill needed for career advancement.

I’ve been lucky as a writer to learn early on to be able to identify which subjects I have the life experience and the writing chops to tackle, which ones I need to let ride for a while, and which ones I have no business writing about.

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I agree, Liz. The “what do I have to do to get an A” is a real shame. But I understand that high marks are essential in academia for scholarships and grants. As well, teachers are guided by the grades of their classes, as well. Even so, I believe that progress is being made and that humanity’s hunger for knowledge and experience will lead the way.

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Thanks for bringing us into your virtual library, Rebecca. Hearing Pete read from his delightful book was a real treat.

When I think about the very few teachers I ever went back to visit, I realize what a wonderful teacher Pete must have been.

I agree that adults can learn from children. Sometimes, they remind us of the things we’ve forgotten.

In his final remarks, Pete is still advising us. Still being a great teacher. Thanks Pete!

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Many thanks for listening in and for joining the conversation, Dan. Children do remind us of things we’ve forgotten – the fun of riding a bike, the excitement of reading a book for the first time, learning how to play the first piano piece with two hands, staying up to 12 midnight to ring in a New Year – and the list goes on. I agree – Pete is a great teacher. His students had a great beginning to their life-long journey.

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One of the things I miss about being around kids is watching their eyes light up when they see something new that no one has ever shown them, Rebecca. As your mom, sister, and you discussed in your podcast, we should always strive to keep learning. Having an active mind and body is the best way to live.

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Having previous students stay or get back in touch after so many years reminds me of the importance of role models. In thinking about the teachers who made the biggest impression on me, they shared one thing in common. They genuinely cared for and were invested in their students’ lives. When young people realize their teachers care about them as humans as much as students, terrific things can happen. Thanks for listening in, Dan.

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Thank you, Rebecca, for this new and special series with Authors reading their books. This first author is special to me because he has a special interest in young school children–a very special life choice. Thank you for including the two photos of young school children-so lovely!
Pete’s opening remark is very important because he starts with the fact that teaching is all about relationships! That belief alone guarantees that he is an excellent teacher! It is equally important that Pete considers and keeps in touch with his students after they have finished their years of learning under his capable instructions! Pete lists in his remarks some valuable choices that his students should make and I believe he tried to instill those values as well as such things as forgiving others, reading and numbers! In fact, I am impressed by his respect for children, their ability to forgive and to “get along” with their piers, often not even understood by adults. Thank you for the story of Janet! Truly, a great article! !

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I just heard that one of my former students is getting her teaching credential. I root for all my kids (they will always be “my kids.”), but it’s always exciting to learn that any past student is choosing a path to help children.

I enjoyed your podcast with your two daughters, Ms. Frances. I love your attitude about wanting to be a lifelong learner. I share a similar philosophy. Every day is an opportunity to learn something new.

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It is totally clear from his book excerpts, his conversation on this podcast, and the way he speaks of his former students that Pete was and is an extraordinary educator. And the story of “Janet” is poignant and inspiring. Yes, there are amazing kids out there — kind, smart, hard-working — who offer hope for the future in a world with too many unkind people. Thanks, Rebecca, for offering another stellar listen!

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Thank you for listening in, Dave! I agree – there are amazing kids out there that are eager to take on the challenges that await their generation. We lived through tumultuous events over the past decades, even as our grandparents and great-grandparents experienced huge transitions. Through this all, teachers have been the “knowledge” communicators. I would have loved having Pete as a teacher!

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I get a little fired up when people badmouth young people these days because I see a lot of bright minds that fill me with optimism for the future. It’s a different world than the one we grew up in, Dave, but I see many committed and intelligent people who care about the world and want to do something positive.

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So great listening to Pete here. He sounds just like I imagined he would, lol. Pete exemplifies the importance of great teacher/student relationships. And it’s no surprise his students admire him and his teaching legacy lives on. He is a wonderful mentor. We all have things to learn from one another no matter how young or old. I am looking forward to reading Pete’s book I’ve pushed up on my Kindle. ❤

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Aw, blushing. I’m picturing our wonderful DJ Rebecca saying, “Here’s an old favorite from a guy who needs no introduction. Uh, what did you say your name was fella?”🤣

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Thank you Debby for listening in and moor your insightful comments. Yes!!! Pete exemplifies the importance of great teacher/students relationships. Looking forward to hearing your thoughts on Pete’s book – I know you will love how he brings teaching alive.

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No doubts Rebecca. I’ve been reading Pete’s blog for a few years now, this interview only confirmed what I know about Pete. And was great to put the voice to the person. Hugs ❤

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Thank you once again for the opportunity to share my book with others, Rebecca. I’ve been following you for less than a year, but I always enjoy your podcasts with interesting guests and thought-provoking topics. Continued success with all of the stimulating dialogue you make happen.

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I am thrilled that you joined me for a reading of They Call me Mom, Pete. There is so much wisdom and experience held between the covers of your book. I am excited that you are on another adventure to write children’s books. You are an amazing teacher!

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HI Rebecca, it is wonderful to see/hear Pete Springer on your blog with this podcast. I remember that part of his book about Janet very well, what an inspiring young girl. I agree with Pete that the Generation Z and Alpha’s have a lot to offer the world. They are going to fix the mistakes of our generations and I think they are a strong and determined bunch of young people.

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I’m sure your boys are living testament to that. How is Greg’s (I hope I got the right boy) time at university? Isn’t it the best feeling watching your boys grow into men, Robbie? This year is a big one for our son. He’s turning 30 and will be married next June. Despite all of his academic successes, the thing I’m most proud of is he is a good human being.

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HI Pete, your son is definitely a good human being and I hope you will share a little about the wedding. I was married when I was 29 and Terence was 28. Greg is doing very well at university. We are waiting for his exam results but his semester scores were all in the high 90s. Pretty astonishing for maths at Uni level.

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Thanks so much, Rebecca. I’m always interested in learning more about your interesting guests on Tea, Toast, and Trivia. Glad I could be a part of it.

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Thanks, Teagan. Rebecca and her husband, Don, are so cute together. They make a great team. Doesn’t Rebecca have the perfect voice for audio?

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