Season 3 Episode 41: Happy Thanksgiving

“Come, ye thankful people, come, 
raise the song of harvest home; 
all is safely gathered in, 
ere the winter storms begin.”


“Come, ye thankful people, come” 1884 Henry Alford
Tune “St. George's Windsor" by George Job Elvey

Welcome to Tea Toast & Trivia.

Thank you for listening in.

Happy Thanksgiving!

I am your host, Rebecca Budd, and I am looking forward to sharing this moment with you.

October 11, 2021, marks the celebration of Canada’s Thanksgiving Day.

Autumn, with its crisp winds and changing colours, ushers in moments of reflection and a feeling of warm nostalgia.  It is harvest time, when visions of canning vegetable and preserving jams and jellies remind me of family and community gatherings.  What better time to commemorate thankfulness?

Thank you for celebrating Canadian Thanksgiving with me on Tea Toast & Trivia.  A special thank you to my brother, Brian for his rendition of the hymn “Come, ye thankful people, come,” which was set to St. George’s Windsor, by George Job Elvey.

Until we meet again, dear friends, I leave you with the words of Meister Eckhart, German theologian, philosopher, and mystic.

“If the only prayer you said was thank you, that would be enough.”

Happy Thanksgiving Tea. Toast. & Trivia.

38 Replies to “Season 3 Episode 41: Happy Thanksgiving”

    1. I confess, Darlene, that I didn’t know about all the iterations of Canada’s thanksgiving. It was fun to look back into history and see that thankfulness is a tradition that has flourished over the centuries – that we continue to be thankful as individuals, as communities, as a nation. Happy Thanksgiving – sending hugs across the ocean.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. We are indeed a thankful nation and may we continue to do so. I grew up in a “count your blessings” household. Even now, if I feel a bit down, I think of three things to be grateful for and feel better immediately. Better than pharmaceuticals!

        Liked by 3 people

  1. Happy Thanksgiving, Rebecca! Thank you so much for sharing the brief history of Thanksgiving in Canada and the US. What a beautiful reflection that thanksgiving is the gratitude of being. I love the hymn your brother shares. Yes, every day is a thanksgiving day!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. I am so glad that we are celebrating thanksgiving together this year, Miriam. I’ll be joining you in November. Sending many hugs yours way.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I’m looking forward to Thanksgiving in November, Rebecca, even though I don’t know our family plans yet. We’re flexible.

        Liked by 2 people

  2. That was really enjoyable, Rebecca. I didn’t know anything about Canada’s Thanksgiving.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I confess that I didn’t know all of the iterations of Canada’s thanksgiving either! YIKES! Anyway, this mini research project has prompted me to look at how other countries celebrate thanksgiving. Here are two examples: In Germany, thanksgiving is often celebrated on the first Sunday in October and is called Erntedankfest (meaning “harvest festival of thanks”). In India, Thanksgiving isn’t recognized as a national holiday, however there are several feasts at various times throughout the year convey the theme of giving thanks, such as Onam, celebrated in South India, and Vaisakhi, celebrated in Punjab and Haryana. I’m looking forward to reading up on other thanksgiving celebrations.

      Liked by 4 people

      1. I’m not sure a lot of USAers know the origins of our Thanksgiving these days. Foreigners probably know the history better than the natives.

        Liked by 3 people

      2. The more I look back into history, the more I am grateful for historians and the more I realize that we must tell the story of our generation

        Liked by 2 people

      3. And we must tell the good the bad and the ugly truths of our generations and before, as well. It’s one thing to correct misinformation, but there is too much revisionist history going on these days because people don’t like what happened in the past.

        Liked by 3 people

      4. To Timothy’s point, I remember reading a bit of revisionist history when I was in school that claimed the first Thanksgiving in the US took place in Jamestown, Virginia, not Plymouth, Mass and featured ham not turkey. Whether reliable sources were cited for the article, I have no idea.

        Liked by 2 people

  3. Happy Thanksgiving Rebecca. “ Come, ye thankful people, come,” Is one of my all time favorite hymns. I remember being among the Sunday school students gathered in front of our little church to sing it to the adults. Thanksgiving is a special time. I have many fond memories. Thank you for highlighting the many reasons we have to be thankful. Thanks also for sharing your brother’s wonderful music.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Thank you for joining me on Canada’s Thanksgiving. I will be heading down your way to celebrate your Thanksgiving in November. I have been thinking a great deal about gratitude these past months and find that it is a powerful antidote to loneliness that comes with social distancing. It has been gratifying to see that community life and in community building has thrived because we have chosen to look at new ways to connect. It has been an exciting time of discovery. I will share your thoughts with Brian about his music. He will be delighted.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I knew you would, Liz! How often did we sing this hymn over the years? We may be separated by miles – and yet I hear your voice.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Rebecca, a wonderful Canadian Thanksgiving history lesson along with wise words about living life. Fabulous playing by your musician brother, too. A pleasure to listen to all nine minutes, and a belated Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you Dave for celebrating Canadian Thanksgiving with me! Brian is always accommodating, even when I text him three days before publishing. I am fascinated by the backstory of the Victorian hymns that are still well known and have been reintroduced to our generation. (There is always something to learn) Think of Amazing Grace and all its iterations. I will be heading down your way to celebrate your Thanksgiving in November. P.S. Thanksgiving is always on time. Thank you for listening in and for your amazing support.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. Happy Thanksgiving 2021. Thank you for the delightful review of early events dating from the far north of Canada and the review of other occasions warranting human’s thanksgiving during the years. As I was listening, I was so taken by your interesting coverage of our Canadian history as well as the first Thanksgiving in the Eastern coast of the future USA. I enjoyed your interesting coverage of historical events that deserve places in our hearts from long and more recent times, that I would like to put this in print in a special history folder! Thank you especially, Brian, for your special music accompaniment! !

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Wasn’t Brian amazing, Frances? I asked him just a couple of day before Thanksgiving and he made time in his busy schedule to send me the audio of “Come Ye Thankful People Come.” I confess that much of the history of Canadian Thanksgiving was new to me. What gave me great comfort was that being thankful has always been a part of the human experience. Happy Thanksgiving.

      Liked by 3 people

  6. A belated Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family, Rebecca! Two of your comments in particular struck resonant chords with me. Thanksgiving belongs to every day of the year, and gratitude is a state of being.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I am thankful for our friendship and connection, Liz. I am enjoying Grief Songs and found your poem (see below) has the same feeling of “To Autumn”

      “we did not expect
      Indian summer so soon
      early morning sun
      haze lifts, mountain range appears
      but only for a moment.”
      Elizabeth Gauffreau

      Liked by 3 people

  7. What a great post, Rebecca. I learn so much about Canada from you and I didn’t know much before. You are correct that Thanksgiving is for every day. I hope you had a great celebration!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I confess that I ate too much pumpkin pie this past weekend – it tasted so good and I understand that one slice of pumpkin pie contains more than the recommended daily value of vitamin A, which benefits eyesight and the immune system. Pumpkin filling also has potassium, vitamin C and iron, which will all boost your mood. So I am glad that I was able to get three days worth of vitamin A all in one day. Thank you for joining me for Canadian Thanksgiving. I am thankful for our friendship.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Oh, Robbie! This is indeed exciting news. I am VERY interested – will be looking out for the photos. Can I tag along virtually?

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Oh yes, of course. I think you will like it. We are also going to the elephant sanctuary and the ostrich farm. On our way back we are stopping in Bloemfontein to visit the best Anglo Boer War Museum in the world.

        Liked by 2 people

  8. Happy belated Thanksgiving Rebecca and a wonderful introduction to all non-Canadians to the history of your wonderful country.. and that last line does say is all… If the only words you say are ‘thank you’ that would be enough..we have much to be grateful for whatever else is going on in the world.. hugs ♥

    Liked by 2 people

    1. How wonderful to share Canadian Thanksgiving with you, Sally. I confess that I learned something new when I was researching our thanksgiving. Looking back reminds me that thankfulness was a common thread throughout history. And that gives me great comfort.

      Liked by 2 people

  9. I’m thankful for you, Rebecca, and Brian’s lovely accompaniment. I still remember this hymn and lyrics from my childhood. We learned it in public school no less. 🙂 Hugs!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I am so grateful for our friendship, Mary Jo. Every Thanksgiving, “Come Ye Thankful People Come” is the first song that comes to mind. The word ‘come’ is heartening, a welcome, a feeling of belonging. Sending hugs back your way with great speed.

      Liked by 2 people

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