29 Replies to “Season 3 Episode 35: Valerie Peachey on Beginnings, Adventures & Life Stories”

  1. Thank you both for your interesting insights. As Rebecca knows, Laurie, Tristan (our daughter), and I lived in Spain for 4 years. We just up and went and had to go through all the legalities to get residency, which was quite daunting at times. When we were in Spain, the cost of living was quite reasonable as compared to France and Italy, for example. So if the same holds true today, it’s a good place to retire. We had a lot of adventure in Spain, worming our way into cultural activities and aspects where foreigners were not welcome. I have to agree that vacationing is comfortable, adventure is exciting, rewarding, but full of danger. When you go into another culture you have to be humble, respectful, and willing to take risks, to put up with a lot of rejection and a certain amount of abuse to show you are worthy to be accepted as a tangential part of the culture.

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    1. Thank you so much for listening in and for adding depth and breadth to this conversation. What a wonderful experience to live with your family in Spain. It is easy to say, “let’s move to a new country, but is an entirely different thing to actually move to another country. I especially appreciated your words: “When you go into another culture you have to be humble, respectful, and willing to take risks…”

      Liked by 3 people

      1. There is the stereo type of the rude, mean French. While we were living in Spain we made friends with a lot of French expats. They were the nicest people. The first time we drove through France to Italy, everyone we encountered driving from one end of southern France to the other was nice, helpful people. What I discovered is the French, like Spaniards, are very polite, and tended to be more open and friendly than Spaniards with strangers.

        The rude people are Americans, especially many American tourists with their ideas they are somehow privileged and the Spanish and French should feel lucky the rude Americans are visiting their countries. I found that I was still rude compared to French and Spaniards, when I was continuously trying not to be rude.

        We never ran into anyone it France who was rude or mean to us. On the contrary, people went out of their way to help even when we couldn’t understand each other very well.

        There are rude and mean people in every place, but often there is a reason people might be rude or mean to you. Take a look at yourself and see how rude and mean you come across yourself, and then you might understand another person’s bad attitude toward you. That’s my take on it. Be humble and grateful to your hosts when traveling or moving to a new place.

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      2. Tim – your idea of humility and gratitude set the standard of excellence required to create compassionate communities of belonging and well-being. Kindness is a powerful force that opens the doors to outstanding experiences. What we remember at the end, is the love and hope that we received and gave in return. Thank you for your life-affirming insights. Very much appreciated.

        Liked by 4 people

    1. I am delighted that you listened in, Jo! Valerie is a marvelous communicator and Pepper is adorable. It is easy to think that adventures are for the young, but I have found that adventures get even better as we move along our timeline. Valerie’s enthusiasm and opening to possibilities is truly heartening.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. This is an awesome interview, so inspiring. I am proud to call Val Peachy a friend. She lives in the same community as I do in Spain. She is the first and only Canadian I have met here! I agree with what she has to say about the importance of maintaining friendships, near and far, living life as one big adventure and having no regrets. The most important message though is about lifelong learning. My dad always said you should learn something every day and you should never stop learning until you take your last breath. Thanks, Rebecca for featuring Val and her thoughts on living a meaningful life.

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    1. Darlene – thank you for listening in. Serendipity is alive and well. I was amazed that Valerie and you were connected in Spain and that my friend, Chris, thought it would be a great idea to connect Valerie and me. We are over 7000 miles apart, what are the odds that Valerie, you and I would come together. I think some things are meant to be. I agree wholeheartedly about lifelong learning. We need to explore, be curious and courageous. Valerie has a marvelous enthusiasm for “what’s next.” I always think of the quote by Bilbo to Frodo in The Lord of the Rings: “It’s a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don’t keep your feet, there’s no knowing where you might be swept off to.”

      Liked by 2 people

  3. I enjoyed your thought-provoking conversation with Valerie. My adventures and risk-taking of the past few years has been with my own writing–which surprised me greatly!

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    1. I am so grateful that you listened in, Liz. That is the best word to describe the sensation of stepping through a door – surprise. I often wonder what a butterfly experiences emerging from a cocoon. My surprise meeting up with Valerie, was that she was good friends with Darlene Foster of the Amanda Series. Life is full of serendipity moments.

      Liked by 4 people

  4. An inspiring discussion, Rebecca and Valerie! It’s admirable to try new places, to keep learning, and to cultivate long-term friendships — all of which Valerie has done, with infectious enthusiasm. A role model for us all — as you are as well, Rebecca, with all that you do in seeking out new experiences, writing different blogs, and doing your podcast series.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. A few months ago, I lamented that we were unable to travel and explore. Don reminded me, that if we stand still, the world will come to us. Thank you Dave for connecting across the miles and creating memorable posts and conversations. When I sit at my kitchen table having my morning coffee, I am actually traveling the world. And that gives me great comfort. Thank you so much for listening in and for your support and encouragement!

      Liked by 4 people

  5. Hi Rebecca, it is wonderful to meet Valerie, her enthusiasm for life is reflected in her voice and way of speaking. I was so interested that she chose to study further in her 50s. I am a little younger, but I’ve been considering doing the same. I am tired of being a peg in a corporate machine and want to do something more meaningful with my remaining years. I love Valerie’s idea that life is an adventure. I think so too.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Robbie – go for it! My sister Sarah is finishing up her MBA and is looking at a Phd. She is in her mid-fifties. I went back to finish my MBA in my early forties. It was the very best thing I could do at the time. I am delighted that you listened in, Robbie. I always enjoy our conversations.

      Liked by 3 people

  6. A wonderful interview Rebecca and delighted to mee Valerie and Pepper. I totally agree with Valerie about staying engaged and learning new skills as well as reaching out to new people who need our help or who can offer us something to enhance our lives. After 17 years in Spain I know how wonderful life can be there, and wish Valerie continued happiness.. hugsxx Sally.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I thought of you, Sally, when Valerie said that because she travelled at a young age, she embraced, without fear, the idea of moving to a new location. You also had the experience of traveling and living in exotic locations. The more I move forward on my timeline, the more I realize that our lives are enriched by the connections forged over the years – the wealth of friends and family. It gives me great comfort! Grateful for the technology that brings friends from around the globe to my kitchen table. Sending many hugs!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you my dear friend for joining the conversations. What I have learned over the last months is that belonging has taken on a global perspective. I feel that Athens and Spain are as close to me as Edmonton, that friendship has gained strength in a virtual community. It gives me great comfort.

      Liked by 2 people

  7. Thank you, Valerie and Rebecca for this encouraging conversation. I would like to mention, first of all, that I enjoyed hearing about Pepper. What an intelligent dog and the important contribution that is made. We often forget the important part that our animal kingdom makes. Valerie has been involved since her start at 3 years. From there she has traveled the world, persisted in continuing education, finishing her doctorate at an age when most of us have forgotten “school”. Starting book clubs is a way of helping and encouraging others in life long learning. It gives friends a way to discuss, disagree, argue and encourage each other. And–it is FUN to do our projects together! ! Again, thank you for this important conversation–as us evidenced by the positive comments shared!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much, Frances, for your heartwarming comments. We live in a complex world that demands our highest participation. What better way to sharing the challenges and joys than with family and friends. I agree about books clubs bringing people together. Sending hugs along with my gratitude for introducing me to my reading journey.

      Liked by 1 person

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