Season 3 Episode 26: Liz Humphreys & Elisabeth Van Der Meer on the #KaramazovReadalong

“Love is such a priceless treasure that you can buy the whole world with it and redeem not only your own but other people’s sins. Go, and do not be afraid.”  Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov

Welcome to Tea, Toast and Trivia.

Thank you for listening in.

I am your host, Rebecca Budd, and I am looking forward to sharing this moment with you.

Today we are working with the magic of technology to bring together Edinburgh, Scotland, Porvoo, Finland, and Vancouver, Canada for a special event – the launch of the The Brothers Karamazov Readalong. 

The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky has been on my “To Be Read” stack of books for several years but I have hesitated, waiting for the right moment. Then serendipity arrived in the form of an e-mail message from my blogger friend and book aficionado, Liz Humphreys from Leaping Life, announcing that she was organizing a #Readalong of The Brothers Karamazov to coincide with the 200th year anniversary of Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s birth. The stars aligned when Elisabeth Van Der Meer, from A Russian Affair, agreed to join the party.  Liz, Elisabeth, and I are inviting you to join us on this reading adventure.

So put the kettle on and add to the conversation on Tea Toast & Trivia.

Thank you for joining Liz, Elisabeth, and me on Tea Toast & Trivia.  And a very special thank you Liz and Elizabeth for adding your enthusiasm and insights on The Brother’s Karamazov, by Fyodor Dostoevsky.  You have given me courage to open the book that I have always wanted to open.  His words from The Brothers Karamazov will enlighten the journey head., “This is my last message to you: in sorrow, seek happiness,”

You can connect with Liz on “Leaping Life” and Elisabeth on “A Russian Affair.”  You are only an internet click away from entering a world of books and brilliant conversations.

Until next time, dear friends, keep safe and be well.

Julie Riso on Awakening to Nature Tea. Toast. & Trivia.

43 Replies to “Season 3 Episode 26: Liz Humphreys & Elisabeth Van Der Meer on the #KaramazovReadalong”

  1. Wonderful episode. The Brothers K, as we call it, is one of my all-time favorite books. It does change you. It’s such a great novel with so many layers dealing with family and theology. The Grand Inquisitor is a brilliant commentary on free will.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. I am so excited about the #KaramazovReadalong. I confess I had a hard time pronouncing Fyodor Dostoevsky’s name. I practiced it over and over again. Thanks for listening in, Tim and for your enthusiasm for the Brothers K. What an adventure to read a chapter a day and share it with others who are reading with me. Sending hugs to all!!

      Liked by 5 people

  2. It’s so wonderful to be on this adventure with you and Elisabeth! Thank you so much for enthusiastically embracing this project. And of course huge thanks to Don for his tireless and magnificent work on the podcast. I look forward to our coming months together with Fyodor. xxx

    Liked by 5 people

    1. I would have published the podcast earlier in the day, but Don was determined to go over it one more time to improve the sound. We had so much fun meeting up with you and Elisabeth. I was checking our some quotes from the BK and found this “Love life more than the meaning of it.? Only 8 words and that has me thinking. How many more words will we find!!!

      Liked by 5 people

      1. Oh goodness, that quote alone could be the basis for a whole PhD thesis! We are in for quite a ride!!!

        Liked by 4 people

    1. I just found the translation by Constance Garnett – thank you for the recommendation. I am very excited about this readalong. Do stop by and share your thoughts as we go along, Jo!! Would love to hear your perspective. Hugs to you and Carina!

      Liked by 5 people

      1. After reading the book, you may lije to have a look at director Richard Brooks’ 1958 movie adaptation of this Dostoevsky classic with the stellar cast of Yul Brynner as Dmitri Karamazov, Maria Schell as Grushenka, Claire Bloom as Katya and Lee J. Cobb as Fyodor Karamazov. This adaptation is based on the translation by Constance Garnett although the movie has some differences.

        Liked by 3 people

      2. I just found the trailer! Thank you, Jo for the suggestion/recommendation! I was surprised to find that the part of Alyosha was played by William Shatner. I did not recognize the Star Trek captain!!

        Liked by 2 people

    1. I am thrilled that you will be following, Robbie. Would love to hear your thoughts and ideas as we go along. I have never been a part of a readalong before. What better way to start than with Fyodor Dostoevsky!

      Liked by 3 people

  3. Oh, a life changing book indeed! What a beautiful conversation between the three of you. I love the idea of 96 days reading a chapter a day, till his birthday. Thank you for this wonderful episode, my dearest Rebecca! Many hugs your way.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. I am delighted that you enjoyed the conversation, Marina. We would love to have you on the #Karamazovreadalong. I have aways wanted t read Fyodor Dostoyevsky and now the timing is right. Stay tuned for updates. Sending many hugs your way.

      Liked by 3 people

  4. Fantastic discussion, Rebecca, Liz, and Elisabeth! I love the idea of the read-along, loved hearing about Dostoyevsky’s masterpiece of a novel, loved hearing about the highlights and lowlights of Dostoyevsky’s life, and more.

    I’ve read “The Brothers Karamazov” twice — many years apart — and agree that it is an astonishing novel. I like “Crime and Punishment” a bit better overall; almost every moment of that earlier Dostoyevsky book seems perfect, whereas the more sprawling “The Brothers Karamazov” can be a bit inconsistent. But its many high points are among the best in the history of literature, and the novel is probably even more profound than “C and P.” And, yes, as was mentioned, Dostoyevsky can be hilariously funny amid the seriousness; some scenes in “The Brothers Karamazov” are comedic gems.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Thank you so much for adding depth and breadth to this conversation, Dave. I look forward to your comments in the weeks ahead. Will keep you posted on the latest on the #Karamazovreadalong. Now you have me interested in Crime and Punishment and Frances is still heartily recommending The Idiot! This is my year for Russian Literature. I have even downloaded an app on my iPhone to learn the Russian language. I have discovered a few words but I am far from reading BK in the Russian language!! LOL

      Liked by 4 people

    2. Naturally I read this great book, and saw the movie with Lee J. Cobb, Yul Brynner, and Montreal’s then young William Shatner, who just turned 90 yesterday. And lest we forget Maria Schell and Clair Bloom of The Spy Who Came In From The Cold. All this to Rebecca and Dave nudging at an aging memory for a few minutes af reminiscent pleasure. Thanks to you both!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Can you believe the young William Shatner was in the BK movie. I didn’t recognize him. I am delighted that you listened in and hope that you will follow along with this project. More to come. Many thanks for your comments and visit.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. This conversation has meant a lot to me, thank you to the three of you. It brought memories from a quite a few years ago when I enjoyed reading this book. I also read “The Idiot” at the same time, both of them are exceptional, to say the least. This conversation has encouraged me to read this outstanding work again! ! There is nothing like reading an author’s words in a book, but I think this book can possibly be found on audio. (But an audio would take some of the joy away, I believe) The book, for sure, can be found in a library! !

    Liked by 5 people

    1. I am thrilled that you will be reading BK again with us. Yes – there is an audiobook, which I have to go along with my “book” format. Listening will give me a fresh perspective on how to say the Russian names. I had to practice saying Dostoyevsky over and over again and I still do not think I pronounce it correctly. I remember you reading BK and the Idiot. You said I should read these books and here we are ready for the adventure.

      Liked by 4 people

    1. What wonderful words to read – “because it’s a must.” I am beyond excited that we will be having your company along the journey. Sending many hugs along with my gratitude.

      Liked by 4 people

  6. It’s going to be so interesting! The Brothers Karamazov is one of those books that lends itself very well for a readalong, as we each take different things from it, making for a varied discussion and great discoveries. I’m very happy to join you and Liz, and big thank you to Don, the techie!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Thank you, Elisabeth for guiding me through Russian Literature. First Eugene Onegin and then One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovitch. I’m ready for BK. BTW, I just downloaded Subtly Worded by Teffi. I never heard of Teffi before. Don says hello and that he is looking forward to the next update on BK.

      Liked by 4 people

  7. I’ve always wanted (and intended) to read The Brothers Karamazov. As much as I would love to join the readalong, the only way I read Russian literature is as an immersive experience: read straight through with breaks for sleeping.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. That would be wonderful, Dan. I have never attempted a readalong. Liz and Elisabeth are the best of companions. And my mother, Frances, who has read BK before, has joined the party. Thank you for listening in and for your comments. I am delighted that we connected through Teagan. Wouldn’t a readalong of The Dead of Winter be interesting….. Hmmmm…

      Liked by 3 people

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