Season 3 Episode 25: Roberta Eaton Cheadle Reading “A Ghost And His Gold”

Welcome to Tea, Toast and Trivia.

Thank you for listening in.

Roberta Eaton Cheadle

Bookstores, libraries, and coffee shops are great places for book readings. There is something extraordinary about hearing the voice of an author reading their stories. Their voice and intonation are nuanced by the many hours of effort putting pen to paper.  They created the characters, structured the plot, and lived every twist and turn that creates bumps in the storyline. 

Living in the reality of Covid-19, book readings at public libraries and bookstores have been curtailed.  We are learning to embrace technology in new ways.  Welcome the podcast series, “Authors Reading their Books”, which will recreate the reading spaces in a virtual venue.  I invite you to put the kettle on and join the conversation on Tea Toast & Trivia. I am your host Rebecca Budd, and I am looking forward to sharing this moment with you.

I am thrilled to introduce Roberta Eaton Cheadle who has graciously agreed to be our guest author reading from her novel, “A Ghost and his Gold.”  Roberta is a South African writer specializing in historical, paranormal and horror novels and short stories. Keep your lights on because we are about to meet up with a sinister poltergeist.

A Ghost and His Gold

Thank you for joining Roberta Eaton Cheadle and me on Tea Toast & Trivia. Authors reading their Books.

And a special thank you, Roberta, for giving us insight into A Ghost and His Gold.  You have inspired me, and I know that you have inspired readers and listeners to embrace a creative journey.

I invite you to meet up with Roberta on her blog, Roberta Writes. It is a place where history comes alive with every page turned.

Until next time, dear friends, keep safe and be well.

Julie Riso on Awakening to Nature Tea. Toast. & Trivia.

Follow Roberta Eaton Cheadle

Website: https://www.robbiecheadle.co.za/

Blog: https://wordpress.com/view/robertawrites235681907.wordpress.com

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/19631306.Roberta_Eaton_Cheadle

Twitter: https://twitter.com/RobertaEaton17

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/robertawrites/?modal=admin_todo_tour

102 Replies to “Season 3 Episode 25: Roberta Eaton Cheadle Reading “A Ghost And His Gold””

  1. I love your accent, Roberta. What an undertaking. The subject is fascinating, and unraveling the history of the victims of the war through their ghosts is brilliant. Ghosts having the presence to attack people reminds me of the Icelandic Sagas. And it worries me a little as one of our kleptomaniac ghosts stole one of our very sharp Japanese knives, and Laurie’s Italian beret, among other things.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Thank you Tim for listening in and for you encouragement of TTT. You always make my day. I once lived in a haunted house and heard my name called a few times and then there was some interesting lighting events (tuning on in the middle of the night). I thought it was just me but years later, Sarah, my sister said that she heard her name called when she was the only one in the house. So, do hide all your valuable, those kleptomaniac ghosts can be cunning! LOL. I agree that “The Ghost and His Gold” was a huge undertaking and the idea of ghosts was ingenious!

      Liked by 4 people

      1. It can be pretty creepy hearing and smelling ghosts. Our cats see the ghosts and watch them. One time, Stretch Kitty who was really sensitive to ghosts, was walking back and forth and around the table watching something. He sat on the edge of table looking at the stove like someone was there doing something. Laurie and I were sitting at the counter watching stretch watch whatever he was seeing. Stretch walked to the edge of the table nearest to us intently watching something we couldn’t see. All of a sudden, we smelled coffee, a really strong smell of coffee. Neither of us had coffee at that time of night. We looked at each other and said “The ghost just made coffee!”

        Liked by 4 people

    2. HI Tim, thank you for your lovely comment. There are lots of different accents in South Africa as we have 11 official languages. Mine is British South African. You had best keep an eye out for that knife yielding ghost, there is nothing worse than an armed poltergeist.

      Liked by 5 people

      1. Our cats can see the ghosts, we hear them and smell them from time time. It’s really creepy when the cats are watching something we can’t see. I’ve often wondered if the ghosts are teaching our African Gray parrot some of his witty sayings and cursing that he hasn’t heard from either of us.

        Liked by 4 people

      2. Cats are definitely more sensitive to things outside our five sense than we are. I think the same can be said for dogs. Our house is the original farmhouse in our area. It was build in 1929. A gang of criminals holed up in this house on the run from the law. There was a shootout and 2 of the criminals were shot and died in the house. It is believed to be haunted. Sadly, I have never seen any sign of any ghosts. I would like be a bit more sensitive to such things, but obviously I am not.

        Liked by 2 people

    1. I am delighted that your listened in, Miriam. Hearing the voice of the author adds depth to the narrative. I especially appreciated Robbie’s commitment to history, to the people who lived during a time of great upheaval. Thank you for your visit and for you comments – very much appreciated.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. I agree with you, Rebecca. Robbie has written three historical fiction. I love her accent that adds the uniqueness of the author.
        I love my husband’s Australian/British accent also. I think it’s charming. ☺️

        Liked by 4 people

    2. HI Miriam, thank you for listening and commenting. I am enjoying the different possibilities presented by podcasts and YouTube. They are certainly the up and coming methods of communication.

      Liked by 3 people

  2. Thanks so much for bringing us a chance to hear Robbie read from her book. Thanks also for reminding us to keep a light on – that was a scary section. It’s wonderful to hear the author read her words. I also enjoyed the opportunity to learn a little more about her writing process, and the care she put in to presenting some complex history in a fictional story. It helps me better understand and appreciate the story. Excellent program – thanks again!

    Liked by 6 people

    1. I am beyond thrilled that you listened in, Dan! Thank you for your encouraging comments. Robbie’s discussion on her research and writing process was remarkable. Her attention to detail as well as her commitment to include all voices is a testament to her profound love for South Africa. I agree, Dan – this was a complex history. Robbie’s diligence and compassion for her characters gave me a fresh perspective. Thank you for connecting – looking forward to our ongoing dialogue.

      Liked by 5 people

    2. HI Dan, I am so glad you enjoyed the reading and the overview of my writing process for this book. I think I am addicted to research as my latest WIPs are involving an equal amount of research on different subject matters. I discovered yesterday that there is a term for science fiction literature that is characterised by its concern for scientific accuracy and logic and it is hard science fiction. I do believe my latest work about climate change and the fourth industrial revolution will fit into this category. It is very important to me to be accurate in my facts, historical or futuristic.

      Liked by 4 people

  3. This was a rivetting part of the book. I loved how the ghosts told the story and moved it along. Robbie reads it so well too.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Thank you, Darlene for listening in! I agree – Robbie has an excellent reading voice perfect for introducing an impending sense of fear. Even at the last sentence when she mentioned the heat – I felt goosebumps! I am grateful that you and Robbie have graciously agreed to share your books through your voices on TTT. The narratives come alive! Sending hugs and thanks your way!

      Liked by 4 people

  4. Rebecca, you provide a wonderful service in having authors read their works on your podcast during this pandemic time. Robbie, great reading of your compelling work! Quite a scene you take us through! And, Robbie, I also enjoyed hearing your thoughts on how you do your research (hooray for diaries!), the importance of getting different perspectives in historical fiction, and how a war can really alter the path of a country’s future. Thank you!

    Liked by 5 people

    1. I agree Dave – hooray for diaries! I am delighted that you listened in to Robbie’s reading. She has a marvelous way of bringing out the chills of having a poltergeist in the room. YIKES! Don and I were inspired by Robbie’s commitment to research and to including all the voices. As well, her thought on writing chapter by chapter and not overlapping the time periods was an excellent idea. And yes, the theme of war and what it does to a nation, to a culture, to an individual – is a profound reminder to seek positive outcomes for all. Every act of kindness is important.

      Liked by 5 people

    2. HI Dave, I agree that Rebecca is a treasure for authors, readers, and people with an interest in literature and history. I am glad you enjoyed the podcast and the information about my research process. The British are certainly world leaders on recording events through diaries, books, letters, and other methods. If it wasn’t for diaries we would know a lot less about many historical events. I saw this trait coming strongly to the fore during the pandemic and many British authors and writers have written books and poems about their pandemic experiences.

      Liked by 4 people

  5. I enjoyed this immensely. What a wonderful reading by Robbie. I liked the fact the seance was written in the present tense. It gave an immediacy to the unfolding events, creating the impression the reader is a character. When Robbie spoke of how the Great African War was virtually a civil war turning neighbour against neighbour and tearing families apart, I was struck by the similarity to the American Civil War fought a generation earlier. To look at them dispassionately, both of these brutal wars provided dress rehearsals for World War 1, the war to end all wars. Like Robbie said it is important to remember huge wars are fought by ordinary people, it is those whose lives are torn apart, and often those very people who history forgets. So good on Robbie for remembering them in her historical novel. Also she made a nice point about how historical events have shaped not only our present but also the future, that grows out of it.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Paul – excellent thoughts about history being about ordinary people who are compelled by circumstances and events to lead very different lives than they anticipated. Robbie’s research into reading diaries fascinated me. Of one thing we can all be certain – decisions made at one point in time have repercussions far into the future.

      Liked by 4 people

    2. HI Paul, thank you for your thoughtful comment. It is interesting that you mentioned the American civil war. I am re-listening to Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell and experiencing the horrors of that war and the terrible devastation it wrought on the civilian population. I have also read The Red Badge of Courage and experienced a similar overwhelming horror at the destructive nature of war. The effects of the Second Anglo Boer War can still be felt today and there is still bad feeling among some sectors of the population. This is actually what triggered my research into the detail of this war.

      Liked by 4 people

      1. That is fascinating Robbie about the on going bed feeling still left by the African War. History is never something that stays in the past. The repercussions of the 1921 Partition of Ireland, the Henry VIII’s Acts of Union to incorporate Wales (although some would argue it goes much further back) are all still hot (and BITTER, BITTER) topics today as any cursory glance at a British news channel will tell you.

        Liked by 4 people

      2. Hi Paul, King Henry VIII was such a villain and effectively a serial killer. There is also the Jacobite uprising and the terrible outcome of that for the Scots. Certainly British history is blotted with tragedy.

        Liked by 3 people

    1. I am delighted that you listened in, Marina. Roberta has an excellent voice for reading and for reciting poetry. Words come alive when they are spoken aloud.

      Liked by 3 people

  6. I really think your original idea of having authors reading their own words is excellent—who else has really lived and wrote the words. This short reading, while a bit scary, perhaps, tempts us to read the entire book. I enjoyed the author’s voice, her choice of words and the way the story progresses. The entire book would be worth the read. I especially respect the way she does her research, her special care and respect for the characters and for the history it describes. This reading was an excellent experience.

    Liked by 7 people

    1. I knew you would love this podcast, Frances. I agree, listening to Robbie read The Ghost and His Ghost was a great experience. Her choice of words created a feeling of dread, perfect for the scene as well as revealing the individual personalities. Thank you so much for your visit and comments!!!

      Liked by 4 people

    2. Hi Frances, thank you for adding your thoughts. I feel as if I know you a little from listening to the lovely book discussions between Rebecca, Sarah and you. I am glad you appreciated my writing process. The ghostly paranormal elements bind the story together and provide an interesting platform for the historical elements of the novel.

      Liked by 5 people

  7. From the opening scene of Robbie’s reading I thought, “Uh oh, nothing good can come from this!” One experience at a high school pajama party with a Ouija board was enough to keep me away! Fiction is such a wonderful way to learn histories unfamiliar to us, and Robbie has found a nifty technique of combining the supernatural with the historical to make the past come alive. I really admire writers who are diligent researchers, highly organized and who can tell a great story. Plus, Robbie writes across several genres, from children’s books with recipes to mature psychological thrillers like this. I greatly enjoy this Readers’ Series, Rebecca, and can’t wait to see who’s next.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Mary Jo – I had a similar experience in high school YIKES!!! Which was enough to keep me away too! Robbie’s use of the paranormal was ingenious. She pulls us into the story and delivers that special feeling of mystery and dread that everyone looks for in a ghost story. Her commitment to the authentic history with fiction is remarkable as was the hours of research that went into the narrative. Thank you again for your amazing support of TTT. Sending many hugs your way!

      Liked by 5 people

      1. HI Rebecca, I don’t know if I told you that I have never even seen a Ouija board. I learned about them from Stephen King’s and other authors books and thought they sounded very interesting. I had to do a lot of research to include one in this story as I would hate to incorrectly present a concept that has become quite imbedded in American culture. I actually thought its origin was in Voodooism but it seems that is not the case.

        Liked by 4 people

      2. Hi, Robbie. I didn’t realize that you’re personally unfamiliar with Ouija boards. Rebecca, Mary Jo, and I are about the same age, and Ouija boards were very big (and controversial) when we were in high school. I owned one, as a matter of fact.

        Liked by 3 people

      3. Hi Liz, I am glad my lack of personal experience with Ouija boards isn’t noticable when I discuss this topic. I did a lot of research on them and have read many books that feature them. I was brought up a very strict Catholic and attended a convent for much of my school life. The nuns and Father Muike were very against any such things as well as Tarot cards and séances. It is quite interesting really, given that Catholicism is steeped in mysticism and superstition in many places in the world. The effects of my upbringing show in my work as I always have a strong religious thread.

        Liked by 2 people

    2. HI Mary Jo, I am glad you enjoyed the reading. I combined the historical elements of this story with paranormal elements to make it more exciting and enticing to readers. My goal is to share history with people who would not necessarily gravitate to a purely historical book because of preconceived ideas about historical content. I go through patches of great enthusiasm for different types of writing including poetry and children’s books. I wasn’t going to write another Sir Chocolate book, but the idea of sugar dough dogs came to mind and now another is already in advanced stages. Rebecca is an innovative and interesting blogger with a fabulous way of combining the future of marketing with current trends. I have embraced YouTube and podcasts in a much bigger way because of her efforts.

      Liked by 5 people

      1. Yes, we know that, but the accountant’s wouldn’t want to accept an answer that was scientific and logical, isn’t that right Jim? Accountant’s look for logical explanations. This isn’t a bad thing, especially given the nature of the role of the accountant and auditor. Many of the characteristics of people I’ve worked with for the past 20 years are woven into Tom’s character.

        Liked by 2 people

    1. How wonderful to read your comments, Annette. Life is an amazing celebration when shared with kindred spirits. I agree – Robbie’s voice brought a nuance of mystery and the unknown. It was indeed spooky.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Jacqui for listening in and for making an excellent point about time. Less is more! We live in a busy world that places competing demands of family, work, creative time and downtime. But we also want to keep connected in the virtual world. Podcasts are like being in a restaurant and listening in to a great conversation at the next table. The conversation is so good that you want to join in and meet new friends. Thank you for being a writer. I’m glad that we connected.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. What I particuarly like is that I know I will have a good experience listening to the podcast–but I have no idea what the topic for discussion will be.

        Liked by 3 people

      2. Liz – you are a wonderful encouragement. I am grateful to all those who join me on TTT and graciously share their knowledge and experience.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for listening in, Jan, and for your heartwarming comments. I hope that more writers will consider reading from their books. The narrative comes alive when we hear the authors voice. Robbie’s YouTube channel is a wonderful place to visit.

      Liked by 4 people

  8. I enjoyed Robbie’s reading from A Ghost and His Gold, as well as the thought-provoking discussion that followed it. The question Robbie’s discussion of historical research prompted in my mind was how much liberty writers can take with the historical record for the sake of the fiction. There seem to be two schools of thought on the question.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I am certain there is a robust debate on that point, Liz. I especially appreciated Robbie’s diligence in looking back into the diaries and her commitment to include all the voices. I often wonder what historians will say about our time 50 years from now. I am glad that we are writing, blogging and journaling about our time in history. That is why I’m enjoying my discussions with Frances on her memories of the Great Depression. I always enjoy our conversations, Liz!! Thank you.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. You’re welcome, Rebecca! You might be interested in a new book just out by Joy Neal Kidney, Leora’s Dexter Stories: The Scarcity Years of the Great Depression. Leora was Joy’s grandmother.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. I agree wholeheartedly , Robbie. Frances lived during a time of one room school houses and ladies aid groups that met to make quilts. We know history through diaries.

        Liked by 2 people

    2. Hi Liz, that is an interesting question. I try not to take any outside of using a fictional character so I am not tied to a real persons historical path and actions. I started off using a real Boer for this story, but I felt I couldn’t take liberties with the real facts of his life so I changed him to a fictional character. I am meticulous about my research and will look up everything from clothing, to toilets, to food stuffs. I check and double check facts and information. I don’t like the idea of misleading people about history and I would be irritated if I discovered the fact base in a historical book I read weren’t truthful and reasonable.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. I’m a meticulous fact-checker as well. (E.g., when were Q-Tips invented? What about the Rueben sandwich?) The way I was taught wasn’t to try to preserve or represent the historical record accurately, but to avoid pushing the reader out of “the fictive dream” with an anachronism.

        The example of a failure to fact-check that I remember one professor in particular giving was a reader who contacted him to point out that he made an error in having his characters hang a deer from the crotch of a birch tree to dress it. Birches don’t have crotches, apparently.

        Liked by 3 people

      2. That is interesting. I think that may have worked in the past when readers didn’t have access to so much historical information, but not now. If the facts are correct, readers are very quick to say so and to castigate the author. I think the expectations have changed.

        Liked by 2 people

    1. I am delighted you listened in, Sally! Thank you for your amazing support and encouragement of our blogging community. Sending many hugs!

      Liked by 2 people

  9. Rebecca, you have a hit here. What a great conversation! Maybe one day you can do a Zoom group chat thing for real life ghost stories. It’s a not-well-kept secret that I have experiences of my own. I actually used to do some “medium” work. But I never conducted or participated in a séance — just no opportunity. Back then I followed advice that Ouija boards were dangerous because you had no control over who you were inviting — that it was like opening a door to ANYthing out there. Now I believe that we can put constraints on that too, if it’s part of our intent.
    This is one of Robbie’s best books. (It would be hard to choose just one favorite.) I encourage everyone to subscribe to her YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVyFo_OJLPqFa9ZhHnCfHUA/videos

    Robbie, thanks for doing this reading and sharing more about A Ghost and His Gold.
    Hugs on the wing!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Teagan – how wonderful to find your comments this morning. You always give a lift to my day. Thank you for your support and encouragement of the TTT Reading Room, which began with you and Liz Gauffreau. Listening to authors read their books is an extraordinary experience, one that brings the narrative to life and memory. Robbie’s reading catapulted me into the room where the poltergeist was awakened. I felt the angst of the unknown – and what should we do next. I have subscribed to Robbie’s YouTube channel and encourage others to do so as well. I have also subscribed to your channel as , Teagan and encourage everyone to listen in.. https://youtube.com/channel/UCoM-z7_iH5t2_7aNpy3vG-Q. Sending many hugs on the wing with great speed.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Hi Teagan, a conversation about real ghost sightings would be fascinating. Sadly, I have not had any noteworthy experiences in that regard. Thank you for your great comment about this book and for sharing my YouTube channel link.

        Liked by 3 people

  10. OMG! Apologies!
    I had listened to this a few days ago. I’m not sure why I didn’t comment, however I have had a hard time focusing due to ongoing construction.
    I adore listening to Robbie read. I also like what she read, from “A Ghost And His Gold”.
    Robbie, you praise so many others works. You are a writer on your own, and read other writers.
    You also read …out loud…lol there’s reading and readings.You do both.
    Here we are in Rebecca’s Readings Room, and it is a wonderful thing that Rebecca is hosting.
    Think I will pop over to Robbie’s Youtube channel, now and listen to her wonderful voice some more!
    Okay guys, have wonderfulness!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. You will enjoy Robbie’s YouTube channel, Resa. So pleased you enjoyed this podcast. Doesn’t Robbie have the perfect voice for “The Ghost and His Gold.” I have added a new word to my vocabulary! “Wonderfulness”. Please take care of yourself with all of the construction. Noise pollution is real and debilitating! Sending hugs!

      Liked by 2 people

  11. Robbie has such a wonderful voice and accent. I’d love her to read the whole book to me! A great story that I enjoyed. She’s a wonderful researcher and writer, and clearly this was a huge project. Thanks for featuring her, Rebecca, and congrats to Robbie. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Diana, for listening in and for your comments. I agree – Robbies research is stellar. Her ability to bring all voices to the narrative is a testament to her compassion for her country. A Ghost and His Gold was a huge undertaking and not for the faint of heart especially linking two time periods.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Her research was one of the things that I liked best about her book Through the Nethergate, and I loved the memoir she wrote with her mom While the Bombs Fell. It was full of wonderful detail. I hope she returns to TT&T for some more readings. 🙂 Well done.

        Liked by 2 people

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