Season 3 Episode 14: Teagan Ríordáin Geneviene Launches “Dead of Winter”

Welcome to Tea, Toast and Trivia.

Thank you for listening in.

I am thrilled that Teagan Geneviene has joined me on Tea Toast & Trivia to discuss the launch of her book, “Dead of Winter”. The adventure is coming to readers in a series of Journeys. I have read Journey 1, Forlorn Peak, and Journey 2, Penllyn, and now await, with great anticipation, the next installment, Journey 3, The Fever Field.

Teagan makes brilliant use of serialization to enhance a reader’s experience. What began in 1836 with Charles Dickens’ “the Pickwick Papers” is making a comeback in our timeline. Serial novels encourage us to savour the narrative, to reflect with expectation to what comes next.

I have been looking forward to this conversation with Teagan.  Journey I and Journey II explore themes of resilience and coming of age within a world that is in transition.

Thank you for joining Teagan and me on Tea Toast & Trivia. And a special thank you, Teagan, for introducing “Dead of Winter” in our virtual reading room.  

I invite you to meet up with Teagan at https://teagansbooks.com/ You are only an internet click away from meeting up with Emlyn, her teacher Osabide, and The Watcher. There are more adventures yet to come!

Until next time we meet, keep safe and be well!

Dr. Leith Davis on The Lyon in Mourning Tea. Toast. & Trivia.

  1. Dr. Leith Davis on The Lyon in Mourning
  2. Teagan Ríordáin Geneviene Launches “Dead of Winter”
  3. Tim Price on Blogging, Photography & Connecting
  4. Mary Jo Malo on Poetry & A Poet’s Calling
  5. The Trio on the Art of Cursive Writing

Teagan on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/13707141.Teagan_Geneviene

You can also visit Teagan at:
Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Teagan-Riordai…
Twitter: https://twitter.com/teagangeneviene
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TeagansBooks
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/teagangenev…
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoM-…
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/teagangen…
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/13707141.Teagan_Geneviene

89 Replies to “Season 3 Episode 14: Teagan Ríordáin Geneviene Launches “Dead of Winter””

  1. That was a really fun interview, I love Teagan’s voice. I know she wants to read for her own audiobooks and it would be a delight to listen to Teagan while driving to and from work and wherever else I need to go. The book sounds wonderful and it’s on my to-read list.

    Liked by 6 people

    1. You are so kind, Tim — thank you. Yes, I really do want to narrate my books. LOL, I need to find the energy and… velocity (maybe?) that some people have, so I can do all the things I want to do. 😀 Many thanks for visiting here. Hugs on the wing!

      Liked by 6 people

    2. I agree wholeheartedly, Tim. Teagan has a perfect voice for reading. She is able to transition her voice between different genres. For example, her reading of Hullaba Lulu was different than her reading of Dead of Winter. Her voice fits to the narrative. I just downloaded Journey 3 and will be reading it this coming weekend. Thank you for listening in!

      Liked by 5 people

      1. Teagan is also good at transitioning between accents, also. She would make a great voice actress, also.

        Liked by 4 people

      2. You got some pretty good accents in singing parodies. Your southern drawl is great and you sounded almost New Mexican in TT&T.

        Liked by 3 people

      3. Ha! That’s interesting. Mostly because 15 years ago, when I lived in Albuquerque, I never could determine anything that I thought was a New Mexican accent. Maybe it’s similar to southern.
        It’s completely unintentional on my part, but I’m one of those people who accidentally picks up the accent of the people in the conversation. I always hope they don’t think I’m making fun of them. Once, back in the bad old days, I went to Jamaica. Before the shuttle got from the airport to the resort, I was talking like the bus driver. Deliberately doing an accent is a different matter. LOL. Happy Sunday.

        Liked by 3 people

      4. After our first year in Spain my parents decided to come and visit. We called to make arrangments. After not hearing my mom’s voice for over a year I was shocked because she had a mild Texas accent.

        Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you kindly, Jean-Jacques. The story is “high fantasy”, but for the most part, the magic element is rather understated. It doesn’t run riot with wizards, broomsticks, and super-powers. Stay safe and well. Hugs on the wing!

      Liked by 4 people

      1. I hear you, dear lady, and thus so since you are obviously a proponent of fantasy, I assume you will agree that a live without fantasy, regardless of level, would be a sadly lacking existence without imagination!

        Liked by 4 people

      2. I agree, Jean-Jacques – fantasy is an essential element of our stories. It is where imagination is given fresh perspectives, new possibilities and courage to head out into the unknown.

        Liked by 5 people

    1. I am delighted that you listened in, Marina! I am enjoying Dead of Winter, especially the way that Teagan has structured the story into Journeys. I have been reflecting up the idea of slow verses quick reading – both styles are great, but there is a difference in how we process the information with each style.

      Liked by 4 people

  2. Rebecca, it is such a treat to visit with you! Heartfelt thanks for hosting me. I enjoyed making the audio recording with you and Don. You know I love to talk about writing and stories. ^^’ “Dead of Winter” has such a complex, varied world that I get enthusiastic about discussing it. So, I appreciate this opportunity even more.
    I’m sharing this everywhere, Facebook, Pinterest, BeBee.com, LinkedIn, Twitter… and I’ll reblog as my midweek post tomorrow.

    Yes, I’m publishing a novelette each month in this series. The first three “Journeys” are available: https://www.amazon.com/Dead-Winter-3-Book/dp/B08XWR46T5/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=teagan+geneviene+dead+of+winter&qid=1617722865&s=books&sr=1-1

    And I’m hard at work on Journey 4, putting the finishing touches on the April installment. Coming soon!
    Have a beautiful day. Hugs on the wing!

    Liked by 5 people

    1. What a wonderful conversation, Teagan. Thank you for reading from your first and third Journeys. I am very interested in how the Watcher will guide us through the story. I agree with Tim – your voice is perfect for reading. Looking forward to Journey 4 and for your return to TTT for an update on Dead of Winter! I am fascinated by how you brought the landscape and geography to life. Sending hugs on the wing!

      Liked by 4 people

      1. I blush! ^^’ Thanks, Rebecca. I like that you used the word landscape. I’ve always wanted one of those beautiful epic fantasy maps for this story. I wish I could find the rough notes I made for that… ten years ago.
        More hugs winging back. 🙂

        Liked by 3 people

  3. Marvelous to see Teagan back with a discussion about Dead of Winter and how it came to be written. Fabulous readings too. Teagan has a lovely reading voice. I am reading Journey 3 this weekend and am looking forward to it.

    Liked by 6 people

    1. Thank you Robbie for listening in to this conversation. I am grateful to writers who bring us stories – stories that ignite our curiosity and imagination, I will be reading Journey 3 this weekend with you!! Sending hugs!

      Liked by 3 people

  4. Your podcasts never disappoint, Rebecca, and this one was beautifully done: the conversation, Teagan’s excellent reading of passages from her book, and the music — perhaps chosen/provided by Don (?), the tech-extraordinaire behind the scenes.

    Teagan, your book sounds fascinating — as does your serialization approach that evokes 19th-century publishing while feeling very “today.” (Also timeless is your book’s world being oppressive to women — a very sad reality in the history of humankind, or, rather, the history of humans not being kind. 😦 ) And interesting to serialize a novel that’s basically done, while revising/adapting it to a serial format — including that helpful changing index!

    A VERY worthwhile 21:25 minutes!

    Liked by 5 people

    1. You are so kind, Dave — thank you! I love your turn of phrase about “humankind, or, rather, the history of humans not being kind.”
      During the decade since I finished writing Dead of Winter, I gave a lot of thought about what to do with it. Of course, the biggest obstacle was getting over the gut-punch when Game of Thrones came up with “Winter is coming!” for their tag line… which was a core element in my book. The 2 stories are entirely different, but that didn’t make me feel any better.
      The next largest obstacle was editing that mammoth volume. When I finally thought of this exact method, I plunged into the project. Now I have to catch up with my own unofficial deadline for Journey 4. I’m glad I never made any promises about exact publication dates.
      Heartfelt thanks for reading and joining the conversation. Hugs on the wing!

      Liked by 4 people

      1. You’re welcome, Teagan, and thank you!

        Sorry about that coincidental connection with the “Game of Thrones” behemoth. 😦

        And wise to not have exact publishing dates when there’s so much work involved. The best of luck as that work continues!

        Also, I echo other commenters who feel you would be great at audiobook narration!

        Liked by 3 people

    2. I knew that you would enjoy this podcast, Dave. I remember our first conversation about how the Indie writing community was gaining strength and momentum. This is an exciting and encouraging community – they share insights, information and experience. Thank you for your continued support and encouragement of TTT. Very much appreciated.

      Liked by 5 people

      1. I totally agree, Clanmother — a wonderful community of authors, bloggers, author/bloggers, and blogger/authors. And you have played a major part in helping to grow and sustain that community with your great podcasts, excellent blog posts, and generous comments. 🙂

        Liked by 3 people

      2. Either works for me! Now that I’m a year older I am growing into my “clanmother” persona. Thank you for your encouraging comments.

        Liked by 2 people

  5. Thank you for bringing Teagan back to Tea, Toast and Trivia. It’s wonderful to hear her describe her story and to read from them. I love listening to her voice. I am enjoying this serial story very much, and I’m looking forward to the next journey.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Dan, I really appreciate your support. Thanks for taking time from a busy week to join us here. It wouldn’t be a good conversation without you. And you’re very kind about my scratchy voice… darned allergies. I expect that I’d even manage to have allergies on the moon. LOL. I hope the rest of this week is good to you. Hugs on the wing!

      Liked by 4 people

      1. I do enjoy hearing your voice, but I also enjoy learning a bit more about your writing process and the process of going back and forth between books and serial episode. I think I probably started out like most people and thought it was just division or addition. It’s fascinating to understand that it’s a new adventure for you.

        Liked by 5 people

      2. Thank you Dan for listening in and adding to the conversation, Dan. I share your interest in the writing process and what prompts a story to unfold. It seems that narratives have a life of their own, as if the writer is a guide that allows their imagination and experience to reveal the themes, characters, plot developments. I especially liked when Teagan said that she didn’t like the villain, but it was fun to work with him. Writing has mystery and complexities and words have power to change the world. And what a world Teagan has given us!

        Liked by 5 people

  6. I am also a fan of Teagan’s stories and her voice, and I do hope we’ll get her as a narrator of her stories some time, although I know it’s difficult to fit everything in. Great interview and a fabulous serial, as I can confirm. Waiting for Journey 4. Thanks, Rebecca and congratulations, Teagan!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. You are so kind, Olga — heartfelt thanks. Your reviews of this series mean the world to me.
      Haha, yes, I’ve always wanted to narrate one of my books. I’ve found that it takes me a lot of “retakes” to even record a snippet without a huge number of vocal stumbles. I’m developing a great respect for narrators! Thanks for being part of this conversation. Hugs on the wing!

      Liked by 3 people

    1. I agree wholeheartedly, GP. What first captured my attention was that Teagan was the founder of the 3 Things Method of Storytelling, which was brilliantly display in “The Delta Pearl” narrative. Thank you for listening in – very much appreciated.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. The Three Things began as a writing exercise I gave myself in the late 1990s, Rebecca. I would ask a friend to give me 3 random things, and I would write, just what ever came to mind, until I had mentioned those things. Back then, there was no intention to make a story of them — just an exercise. After about a week, I saw that it was easy to chain the three things from one day to those of the next, and so on.
        I continued to use the exercise from time to time.
        Then when I started blogging, I needed a schtick. I saw plenty of people were doing book reviews. So I started asking the initial half dozen followers I had for 3 random things, and I’ve been blogging serials ever since.
        Many of the serials have been “bookized”. Pip’s Three Things is the first series.

        🙂

        Liked by 2 people

  7. I love the interview and Teagan’s voice. She has a wonderful writing style. I loved the first journey and I’m excited to catch up with the others. Bravo!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Thank you kindly, Gwen. Your wonderful review of Journey 1 means the world to me. When you have time for the others, I hope you love them. I appreciate you joining this conversation today. Hugs on the wing!

      Liked by 3 people

    2. Thank you so much for listening in, Gwen! I am enjoying that the story is being told in serial form which adds a sense of anticipation!

      Liked by 3 people

    1. Ah, the idea of winter was appealing to me, especially after living in Northern Manitoba, Canada. When Teagan said “its the dead of winter” when she looked out her window, I knew exactly what she meant. Unlike Teagan, it never crossed my mind to write a story about it. Teagan’s story captures the essence of a deep winter!! Thank you for listening in and for your comments!

      Liked by 5 people

      1. it was the year we wondered if Spring would ever come. We were in March and still not hitting our daily average highs. Hugs back at you.

        Liked by 2 people

  8. I have enjoyed getting acquainted with this author. As I listened again today, I could not help but notice a lot of interesting twists to the story and how really clever the author weaves character into the individuals as the story progresses. It was exciting, actually to hear her read her own narrative, It was also good to hear that the story developed through the past years. I will await as the story progresses, I am awaiting surprises.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. I know that there will be many surprises, Frances – and many twists and turns, no doubt. Journey 1 – 3 is on Kindle – it will be fun to read this book together in the coming months. I agree – hearing an author read their books provides a vibrancy and dynamics to the story. Thank you for listening in and for your comments!! Sending hugs!

      Liked by 4 people

      1. The prospect of you two reading together delights me. Did you know that Kindle will read aloud? (Or Echo Dot provided a story is on your kindle — so glad you are having fun with yours!) It’s not as good as a real narrator, but it’s better than I expected.

        Liked by 3 people

      2. It’s very cool, Rebecca. Remember I said (or I think I did) that “Alexa” (or Dot or Echo — which ever name you select) can be given different accents? She reads from your Kindle in which ever accent you’ve selected for her too. LOL, I’m just that easily entertained. 😀

        Liked by 3 people

    2. Dear Ms. Frances, it has been a delight to get acquainted with you. You are a gem! Even though I wrote this novel in 2010, this weekend I was adding a new chapter to Journey 4 (coming soon), which does what you mentioned about “weaves character into the individuals as the story progresses”. As a long novel, I did not develop a particular character until later in the story. For a serial, I saw the need to make her more relatable *now* not later.
      LOL. I hope I can provide many surprises. Thanks very much for visiting and listening. Hugs on the wing!

      Liked by 4 people

  9. This was a wonderful interview.
    I had never thought before how writing a series must be different from writing a novel. It was great to hear Teagan outline her process of referencing future events and reminding the reader of past events within a current narrative.
    Of course as Dave and others have said Teagan has a beautiful voice. She does sound like a voice actress, full of depth and emotion.
    Each of the two readings were spot on. The first which occurs right at the beginning was chillingly atmospheric- full of description and breathless in the way it relentlessly drives the reader (listener) into the narrative.
    In contrast the second prologue was reflective and full of nuance. One could immediately tell it was from a later stage of writing, where the reader has come to know, love and understand the characters and the world of the stories. Its writing was more intimate and confidential, revealing yet still teasing.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Thank you, Paul for adding depth to this conversation. The opening of the first Journey set the stage for the unfolding narrative. I had goosebumps! I just listened to a brief video by Ethan Hawke on reading books aloud. Here is a quote from his video that I think you will appreciate: “There’s something about the experience of when a book is read to you that I somehow am intimate with it in a ways that I am not when it’s when I’m on my own with it.” https://lithub.com/ethan-hawke-on-performing-marilynne-robinsons-gilead/#brid_cp_Brid_03127142

      Liked by 4 people

      1. Thank you Rebecca (and I forgot to thank Teagan too for linking the video on Chekov’s Gun -certainly an essential weapon in a writer’s arsenal). I thoroughly enjoyed listening to the talented Mr. Hawke. He is right reading aloud does unlock the emotional power of the written word by bringing alive the cadences, repeating words, word choices and perhaps inter-line rhymes. All elements that add to the emotional impact of a story and as he says truly brought alive when read aloud- this was so apparant even when listening to the first page of Circe.

        Liked by 3 people

    2. Paul, you are so very kind — thank you. Actually I never knew there was a name for the way I was setting things up in my stories — until a couple of days ago. It’s called Chekhov’s Gun. Here’s a video about it, showing film examples, and it’s very fun to watch. “What is Chekhov’s Gun — How Knives Out Perfects the Setup and Payoff”

      Thanks about the recordings too. I’ll be blushing for the rest of the week. ^^’ Hugs on the wing!

      Liked by 4 people

    3. I was particuarly interested in Teagan’s discussion of the process of writing a serial, as well as a series. It definitely requires systemic thinking!

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Thanks Liz. Lucky for me, I’ve been writing blog serials for nine years. So I’ve gotten used to thinking that way. Still, with the decade long gap between writing Dead of Winter, and converting into this serial… it’s like editing someone else’s work. My style has changed since then in many ways. It’s all a fun adventure though. I’m happy that I chose this way of publishing it. Hugs on the wing!

        Liked by 3 people

      2. You’re welcome, Teagan. The editing process for Dead of Winter does sound like a lot of fun, despite the ten-year gap from its creation.

        Liked by 1 person

  10. I adore listening to Teagan read, especially that it’s her own writing!
    I will get to this serial of books!
    Teagan is a wonderful writer. I have the best time on The Delta Pearl, and I’m always tickled when she picks a random item from the period, that I have suggested.
    I just watched half of What is Chekhov’s gun? Gotta go watch the rest!
    This is a fab interview! Thank you Rebecca & Teagan!
    Both of you have easy listening voices! The podcast sounds smooth as a baby’s bottom!
    A bucket full of Bee’s Knees hugs to both!

    Liked by 5 people

    1. I love your bucket full of Bee’s Knees. There is magic that comes through Teagan’s voice, which enhances the unknown of the evolving plot. I think that I met Teagan through your blog, Resa. And I think that I met you through Marina’s blog. The ways of our “blogging” serendipity are mysterious and wonderful. Life is best when shared with kindred spirits. Sending hugs back on swift wings!

      Liked by 5 people

    2. Dear Resa, I could have sworn I replied to your lovely comment last week. At any rate, I’m here thanking you now. I appreciate all your support. Thanks for being aboard the Delta Pearl. You’re the cat’s pajamas for sure.
      Stay happy and sassy, my friend. Hugs!

      Liked by 2 people

  11. This was a fabulous interview with the amazing Teagan. She has such a way with words as she paints pictures and evokes emotions. I loved the readings. It didn´t take me long to be part of the story and want to know more.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you or listening in, Darlene and for adding your encouraging comments. For me, authors reading their books, poetry, short stories is like see a dancer on stage performing a choreography of their design. It is life-affirming connection between writer and listener/reader. When I read Journey 3, I hear Teagan’s voice.

      Liked by 4 people

    2. Darlene, your comment is the perfect start to my Sunday. That is music to my ears. Writing is a visual experience for me. Until I can see it, I can’t write it.

      Many years ago (I don’t remember what TV interviewer said it), I heard someone describe how Alfred Hitchcock perfected the “long shot” (that’s what the interviewer named it) in the openings of his movies. I realized I had seen a couple of novelists do that as well.

      It’s not something I want to over-use. However, at the beginning, and with 1 or 2 chapter beginnings, I try to set up my *long shot*… starting in the nearby distance (say a lamppost on the corner), then coming closer (perhaps across the street), then outside the house looking into a window, and finally inside the room where the people are having dinner.
      Heartfelt thanks for listening, and commenting. Hugs on the wing!

      Liked by 4 people

  12. That is a great way of describing it. I believe the long shot adds mystery and suspense. Which is why Mr. Hitchcock used it I guess. It certainly works for your books.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. So glad that you listened in, Sally! Teagan has been very generous in sharing her story. I just downloaded Journey 4. The adventure continues….

      Liked by 2 people

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