Season 3 Episode 13: Tim Price on Blogging, Photography & Connecting

Welcome to Tea Toast & Trivia.

Thank you for listening in.

I am your host Rebecca Budd, and I am looking forward to sharing this moment with you.

I am delighted and thrilled that my blogger friend, writer, musician, and photographer, Timothy Price has joined me on Tea Toast & Trivia for a discussion about blogging, writing about daily life and engaging within the blogging community.  

I have been following Tim’s blog since my first introduction to his on Resa McConaghy’s Art Gowns, The Art of Glamorous Fantasy. Tim has a marvelous sense of humour and a love of photography and music.  What I especially appreciated about Tim is that he provides sustained support and encouragement to other bloggers. 

Blogging is a way to connect and find kindred spirits, but we all come to this place for specific and individual reasons. Is it to fulfill a personal goal?  Is it to send out a message?  Is it to connect with people with the same objectives?  These are the questions that will be discussed today.

I invite you to put the kettle on and add to this exciting conversation on Tea Toast & Trivia.

Thank you for joining Tim and me on Tea Toast & Trivia.

And a special thank you, Tim, for a brilliant discussion on engagement with a virtual community.

I invite meet up with Tim and his friends on his blog Off Centre Not Even.   It is a great place to hang out and listen to music,

Until next time, stay safe, be well.

Dr. Leith Davis on The Lyon in Mourning Tea. Toast. & Trivia.

  1. Dr. Leith Davis on The Lyon in Mourning
  2. Teagan Ríordáin Geneviene Launches “Dead of Winter”
  3. Tim Price on Blogging, Photography & Connecting
  4. Mary Jo Malo on Poetry & A Poet’s Calling
  5. The Trio on the Art of Cursive Writing

54 Replies to “Season 3 Episode 13: Tim Price on Blogging, Photography & Connecting”

  1. Thank you so much for thinking I was worth interviewing, and for taking the time to interview me. I really enjoyed meeting and talking with you and Don. The interview was a lot of fun. You are really excellent at interviewing people.

    Liked by 10 people

    1. Don and I has so much fun meeting up with you, Tim. Looking forward to our next podcast conversation on music and guitars. I especially appreciated your thought that blogging is documenting our time. I agree that we are, in our posts and comments, adding to the overarching story of humanity. You reminded me that the photos taken during the Great Depression were catalysts for change – and photography continues to be that catalyst today. As you said, until we meet again, let’s keep on blogging.

      Liked by 8 people

      1. I look forward to our next meeting. Thanks so much for everything, Rebecca.

        Liked by 5 people

      2. The comments about the photography documenting the Great Depression reminded me of a series on the Library of Congress website showcasing the work of Lewis Hine, investigative photographer for the National Child Labor Committee in the first quarter of the 20th century, the children working in the textile mills in particular.

        Liked by 5 people

      3. Found the website – thank you so much for this information. https://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/nclc/. “The collection consists of more than 5,100 photographic prints and 355 glass negatives, given to the Library of Congress, along with the NCLC records, in 1954 by Mrs. Gertrude Folks Zimand, acting for the NCLC in her capacity as chief executive.”

        Liked by 4 people

      4. You’re welcome,. It’s a very compelling collection, those thin little girls in filthy dresses and bare feet standing in front of those machines.

        Liked by 4 people

    2. I concur, Tim! Your thoughts about blogging being an organic, sharing adventure are right on. Rebecca and Don are so very warm and welcoming, and you are definitely worth interviewing. I appreciated your honesty about your health and the dedication required for being part of a blogging community. You and Rebecca epitomize everything that’s good about it! You’re photography, writing, music and humor are a daily pleasure. 🙂

      Liked by 7 people

      1. Thank you Mary Jo for joining the conversation. And thank you for your continued support of TTT and the conversations that bring us together. I’m looking forward to Tim’s return visit. I have just added a book to my TBR pile by Kurt Vonnegut
        “Palm Sunday” because of this quote: “What should young people do with their lives today? Many things, obviously. But the most daring thing is to create stable communities in which the terrible disease of loneliness can be cured.” I consider that we are all young and we are creating stable compassionate communities. Sending hugs!

        Liked by 6 people

      2. Thanks, Mary Jo. I really appreciate you and your thoughtfulness and poetry. It’s amazing that with so many blogs out there we like minded bloggers find each other.

        Liked by 6 people

      1. Thank you, Liz, for your lovely comments. I owe a debt of gratitude to those who head out into the podcasting unknown with me. I cross my fingers every time I connect over the internet, hoping that the “wires” will reach across the distance. I remember when I first saw a fax machine and thought it was magic. The magic continues….not sure how it all works, but it is a joy to meet up “face-to-face” with someone on the other side of the world.

        Liked by 5 people

      2. You’re welcome, Rebecca. The magic moment came for me when I watched someone use his laptop to dial into the card catalog of the Norfolk Public Library from a friend’s kitchen. I was just beside myself with excitement!!

        Liked by 4 people

  2. Tim and I are connected via our blog for more than a year now. It’s fun to read his stories about the animals in his neighbourhood. I love his sense of humor when the talks about his cats that live like real kings and queens in his house. As an amateur photographer myself, I enjoy his photography. It’s great to have Timothy in my list of followers.

    Liked by 6 people

  3. Oh, it was such a pleasure listening to this interview. It’s always lovely putting the voice to a friend you ‘follow’ for some time, eventhough, I have enjoyed Tim’s voice multiple times from his brilliant songs! Tim is an exceptional and very supportive blogger and a good friend I was very happy to meet in our virtual [but real] world. His photography [those skies ah…], his stories, his music, his trees [especially my Incognito Tree ;-)] and his kitties and feathered friends bring joy to my days. Thank you, my dearest Rebecca for this! You bring our community even closer… over at Tea Toast & Trivia! Many hugs!

    Liked by 7 people

    1. A brilliant name, Marina – “Incognito.” Thank you for listening in and for your comments. I agree – Tim is an extremely supportive blogger. Even though he has a busy, busy schedule, he is usually the first to comment on blog posts, with an uplifting message. He adds to stories with his music and trees and his humour is contagious. I am delighted that he agreed to share his insights on TTT. Sending many hugs across the ocean.

      Liked by 6 people

      1. Oh, I agree with you and I really wonder being so busy, how he manages to do everything he does and without any compromise! His humor is very contagious, indeed!! Many many more hugs back to you, my dearest Rebecca! xoxo

        Liked by 4 people

  4. I so enjoyed listening to this episode on Tea Toast and Trivia. Tim shared so many person insights. I love how he brought so many things together…blogging is about community and supporting one another. I like the idea of a blog as a ‘life diary’, connecting our experiences with kindred spirits. When you blog, you find like-minded people. Nature-lovers find nature lovers, etc. I also like the thought that blogs serve as an anchor to our past. It is all there in plain sight. I am so glad I listened to this today. I feel blessed by the conversation, and I look forward to when Tim returns to play guitar.

    Liked by 6 people

    1. I am delighted that you listened in, Linda. Thank you for you lovely comments. I agree – when we push the “publish” bottom, we enter of community that thrives on the exchange of knowledge and experience. The world becomes bigger, the adventure grander! Sending hugs!

      Liked by 5 people

  5. Thanks for this interview. I really enjoyed it. I think as well that blogging is about sharing and building communities. Therefore the comments are so important. That’s where the communication takes place. But I have to admit we like getting lots of likes as well – that’s for our narcissistic side. Thank you for making that clear that blogging as an Ego-Trip doesn’t work.
    All the best to you. Thanks for sharing your ideas and thanks to Rebecca and Don as well to produce this interesting podcast.
    Klausbernd
    The Fab Four of Cley
    🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

    Liked by 5 people

    1. I am delighted that you listened in, Klausbernd. I remember the first time I pushed the publish button and wondered what came next. I was going out into the unknown. Just recently, I was checking out the statistics for blogs and found this site which indicates that there are “more than 500 million blogs out of 1.7 billion websites in the world.” The number of blog posts are 2 million daily. YIKES. https://hostingtribunal.com/blog/how-many-blogs/. Hard to imagine that this post has joined the other 2 million(less 1) Humanity loves to connect!

      Liked by 5 people

      1. This need for humanitiy to connect is why I firmly believe that–come what may with higher education–the humanities will always be with us.

        Liked by 5 people

  6. Such an engaging conversation, Timothy and Rebecca! Timothy, I like your philosophy of blogging, your love of cats, and more! I just visited your “Off Center & Not Even” blog to follow it and read it — and I’m very glad I did. Great photography, among other things!

    Liked by 6 people

  7. This was a wonderful interview, Rebecca. It’s so nice to get to know bloggers, like Tim, just a bit more. Thank you for sharing this!

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Thank you, Dale, for listening in and for your heartwarming comments. We belong to an amazing blogging community. See you at Tim’s place!

      Liked by 4 people

  8. Thank you for this delightful interview. I found the conversation a “happy” and positive place to visit and to read. I enjoyed the comments about the trees and the important place they had in several lives. (Sorry one died because of lack of water.) The mention of cats and animals was important to me, they play a big part in our “happy” lives. Keeping of a “diary” is a good idea. I remember my mother keeping a diary during the depression in the 1930s. What stories they would tell if I had kept them. Keeping a photo diary is a fantastic idea. And, I appreciated the remark about the importance of making a better world. Again, thank you–I am looking forward to your next conversation!

    Liked by 7 people

    1. I knew you would enjoy this conversation, Frances! Tim’s insights resonated with our experience. I remember my grandmother’s diary and how I wish we understood the importance of archiving family history. I am so pleased that you have shared many stories of The Great Depression, which has reminded me of our determination to thrive even in uncertain times. Sending much love and many hugs across the 2nd narrows bridge.

      Liked by 6 people

    2. Dear MS Frances
      I agree, keeping a diary is not only of historical value but also for remembering better. What I have written down I remember much better and I suppose it’s the same for photographers. What they photographed they remember much better.
      All the best to you and happy Easter 🐣🐣
      Klausbernd and the rest of
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Hanne-Dina introduced me to Susan Sontag, who had many brilliant thoughts on photography. I think she was a Zen master when it comes to photography. This thought was especially meaningful to mean as I look back on my Father’s photography: “Photographs are a way of imprisoning reality…One can’t possess reality, one can possess images–one can’t possess the present but one can possess the past.” Every time I read those words, I have goosebumps. Sending happy Easter thoughts along with hugs and love to my dear friends, The Fab Four of Cley!

        Liked by 3 people

      2. Dear Rebeca,
        Susan Sonntag got most of her ideas in aesthetics from Walter Benjamin.
        Great the passage you quote! Goethe wrote something similar in “Faust I” when saying if you want to hold the moment you are in the power of the devil.
        With lots of love and big hugs to you and your whole family
        All the best. Happy Easter 🐣🐣
        The Fab Four of Cley
        🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

        Liked by 3 people

  9. Hi Rebecca, this is a delightful interview and I really enjoyed Tim’s comments about blogging. I am impressed by people who blog every day with such dedication. I am a bit of an unplanned blogger, unless I am sharing a committed post for a fellow blogger. I share whatever inspires me on a day at a point in time and I don’t put an awful lot of thought into it. As a creature of great passion, I always hope my enthusiasm for a new topic will engage my readers. I especially loved Tim’s final comments about cleaning up our own back yards. This is close to my heart and something I really try to do in my home city of Johannesburg. When you reach outside of yourself and help others, it makes you happy and fulfilled. If you visibly see differences around you through positive actions, the happiness is tripled.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. I enjoy following your posts, Robbie – your support and encouragement of the writing community has given me a great deal of reading material to consider and authors to follow. I especially appreciated your words: “When you reach outside of yourself and help others, it makes you happy and fulfilled.” Your commitment to literacy for all is heartening. Thank you for listening in and an adding to the conversation. Tim’s insights on blogging as a place to share ideas and experience reflects the way in which you engage within our community. Sending many hugs!

      Liked by 3 people

  10. This was a thoroughly enjoyable conversation. I was initially attracted by Tim’s beautiful photographs, but stayed because I enjoyed hearing his outlook. Again it was a wide ranging discussion and picking out sound bites does it no justice, but I particularly liked his comments on why he blogs and where it came from.
    Although I do not claim to be an expert, I have always thought that it is the darkest times in one’s life that reveal character. You said it well Rebecca, it is about showing up for life.
    I am amazed at his feorcious level of quality output and enjoyed hearing his definition of success. He is right, your work is about doing the best you can do. You have no control over whether people like what you do and so the idea of receiving external validation through likes should never be the driver.
    I also believe in how he described the power of prayer, I think on some fundamental level all life is connected, in much the same way as physicists have demonstrated quantum entanglement. I am not saying the more you put out into the universe the more you get back, but I know people who have turned into themselves in the face of adversity and cut off whatever it is we are part of (the gaiasphere?) and it is heart breaking to watch a soul shrink in a time they need others most.
    And now I am getting maudlin so I will just shut my gob. Suffice to say your conversation certainly made an impression. Thanks

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hi Paul. I am so happy when people get it, and you got it. We are discovering those underlying elements of “life, the universes, and everything” while hitchhiking around the blogosphere (borrowing a bit from Douglas Adams). I think there is also an energy that brings like minds together while also linking disparate personalities that broaden our perspectives and worldviews. Thanks for your wonderful, well-thought-out comment.

      Liked by 3 people

  11. Rebecca,
    I love this interview! Of course I adore Tim.
    He was very modest about the trees.You know, they are actually magic trees.
    Hmm, Tim, I still need a tree for AGM Gi (do you still have that Apple Tree available), and maybe something a bit different for Art Director Rebecca Budd. Some type of grasses (I know the Bamboo is taken).. or a bush, bushes are good. Is the Rose Bush by AGM Marina’s Pear Tree available?
    Open to suggestions, especially now that you have a big feel for Rebecca’s energy.

    Anyway, I got the golden Cottonwoods, and AGM Dale’s Peach Tree!

    What fun! I’m extra thrilled about this podcast, so Tim, would you give Spunkie-Poo 💋 an extra big kiss for me!
    Rebecca, I don’t know if you have a cat, so then give Don a smooch for me, will you?
    This podcast sounds fab.
    {{{HUGS}}} all around!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I am so glad that you introduced Tim! I have enjoyed following his entertaining blogs, reading his supportive and encouraging comments and viewing his creative photography. Don and I had a great time meeting up with Tim on blogging. His insights resonated with my experience. We viewed his amazing guitars and met up with the kitties. I am looking forward to our next conversation. Sending many hugs and love!

      Liked by 3 people

    2. Hi Resa. Rebecca can have the Black Bamboo. The previous claimant has left the blogosphere. I have not heard anything from her in a year now. AGM Gi can have the Apple Tree or the cottonwood that was Robbin’s. Robbin has become infrequent in posting. Bloggers need to stay engaged to keep their claims on the trees. The exception is Mia. She has become an infrequent blogger for a good reason, plus she was the first to claim a tree.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. I’m so excited about my Black Bamboo! Thank you Tim! I checked out the specific and found this on Wikipedia: “Phyllostachys nigra, commonly known as, black bamboo, is a species of bamboo, native to Hunan Province of China, and is widely cultivated elsewhere. Growing up to 25 m tall by 30 cm broad, it forms clumps of slender arching canes which turn black after two or three season”

        Liked by 3 people

      2. Hi Rebecca. We started off with two pots of the black bamboo that cost $200 for each pot in 2003. The nursery staff said to plant it in the shade. I planted them under the giant crab apple trees that shaded the deck. They thrived, but in 2013 I cut down the crab apple trees because they were dying. The black bamboo loves sunshine and took off. It’s now a huge patch that I cut a labyrinth in. I used to dig up the rhizomes to keep it from spreading where I didn’t want it do spread, but then we discovered, cutting off shoots it doesn’t send up another shoot in the same place or near the cut off shoots, so it’s become easy to control.

        Liked by 3 people

  12. Horsefeathers! I’m late for tea. I’m so glad that I didn’t miss this all together, Rebecca. I’ve been blog friends with Tim for years, and all the good things you said about him are true. He let me use several of his photos, and provided inspiration for the “Catseye Glimmer” character in my grownup fairy story, “Thistledown, Midsummer Bedlam.” Thanks so much to both of you for this wonderful recorded visit. Hugs on the wing!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I knew you would love this conversation, Teagan! Tim has a marvelous sense of humour that adds to his wise insights. I love your music collaborations. Simply brilliant! Hugs coming back on swift wings!

      Liked by 2 people

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