Season 3 Episode 6: The Trio on the Family Book Challenge 2021

Welcome to Tea, Toast and Trivia.

Thank you for listening in.   

I am joined by my mother, Frances, and my sister, Sarah to discuss a subject that is close to my heart.  Books! We have embarked on the Family Book Challenge 2021, championed by my nephew Aaron. Join us as we discuss how books transform our lives and how reading within a community of readers expands our knowledge and inspires us to read more. 

So put the kettle on and add to the conversation.  We would love to hear your thoughts on TeaToast&Trivia

I am your host Rebecca Budd and I am looking forward to sharing this moment with you.

Thank you for joining Frances, Sarah, and me on Tea Toast & Trivia. Looking forward to hearing about your reading adventures.

Until next time, dear friends, be safe and be well.

“Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.” Charles W. Eliot

Darlene Foster on Travels with Amanda Tea. Toast. & Trivia.

  1. Darlene Foster on Travels with Amanda
  2. Klausbernd Vollmar on Ugliness
  3. Paul Andruss Reading Jack Hughes & Thomas the Rhymer
  4. The Trio on the 2021 Book Challenge
  5. Elisabeth Van Der Meer & Dave Astor on Why Should We Read the Books We Do Not Want to Read

40 Comments Add yours

  1. Timothy Price says:

    This is a really fun TTT. All in the family. One thing you touched on is changes in writing styles to less detail in many cases. I read several teen fantasies by newly published authors at one point a few years ago. Teen fantasy is not something I seek out. The stories were decent, but what drove me crazy was the lack of description of the main characters. I could not draw an image of them in my mind as I read the stories. I asked those authors about their lack of descriptions, and they all said they didn’t want to stereotype looks, body types, etc. I thought those were lame answers. I never saw the Lord of the Rings movies because I had such a vivid image of all the characters from the books that I didn’t want to ruin them by Hollywood’s vision of the characters. Authors who are masters of their art make everything work so well that reading their stories is like watching a movie. I loved the episode.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      Thank you, Tim, for your support and encouraging comments – so very much appreciated. I have the letters of J.R.R. Tolkien which were complied by Humphrey Carpenter with the assistance of Christopher Tolkien, which I go to every now and again to get a sense of who J.R.R. Tolkien was in “real life”. I read that he did not want any of his stories edited or his scenes shortened. Which goes to your point that his descriptions were so detailed and descriptive that readers were thrust into his narrative without any hope of coming out until the journey was over. I still cry at the parting at “The Grey Havens.” Can you imagine sitting in the next table to the Inklings at The Eagle and Child.

      Liked by 6 people

      1. Timothy Price says:

        I can imagine. I have not read the letters.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Clanmother says:

        I have not read all of the letters – only a very few. Like his books, these letters and long and detailed. I read one that indicated that he was unhappy with the first book cover for “The Hobbit” which was changed, much to his delight. And then I read somewhere that he did not like that English replaced Latin in the Catholic liturgy. So when he attended mass, while other would respond in English, he would respond in Latin using a loud voice.

        Liked by 4 people

      3. Timothy Price says:

        That sounds annoyingly right about Tolkien responding in Latin loudly during mass. It was August 24, 1964 that the first mass was heard in English. Change is almost impossible in the Catholic Church and delivering mass so the masses could understand it? Unheard of for around 1500 years. But I understand where Tolkien was coming from. It’s a little bit like me with screens, I hate screens in church services. I also like the beginning of the Eucharist from the 16th Century we recited when I was young:

        “ALMIGHTY God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, Maker of all things, Judge of all men; We knowledge and bewail our manifold sins and wickedness, which we, from time to time, most grievously have committed by thought, word, and deed, against thy divine Majesty, provoking most justly thy wrath and indignation against us.”

        Now there’s no mincing of words in those words. Nowadays the Eucharist is watered down, even if it’s performed in many Protestant churches. As much as Tolkien protested, I’ll bet Tolkien wasn’t kicked out of church. I might have one up on him for being annoying.

        Liked by 3 people

      4. Clanmother says:

        No, Tolkien remained in his seat, but I can imagine the smiles when people heard his voice!!!!

        Liked by 3 people

  2. elisabethm says:

    Lovely podcast from the trio! Compliments to Don, you sound as if you’re in the same room!

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      I am delighted that you listened in, Elisabeth. Frances wanted me to tell you that she just finished Anna Karenina. She had to put is aside for a while because there is so much emotional nuances in this story. She was very glad that she finished the book. When I was around 10 – 11 and my brother, Wes, was 9, Frances read us John Bunyan’s “The Holy War” (1692) which was all about the war made by King Shaddai upon Diabolus to regain the Metropolis of the World and the town of Mansoul. Now that was filled with great angst!!! But looking back, the story is the same that you find in current movies. I am still amazed about how books link generations and centuries together. Don sends his thank! He is working on having 4 on a podcast! Hugs and more hugs!

      Liked by 6 people

      1. elisabethm says:

        So nice to hear that Frances finished reading Anna Karenina! I do hope she enjoyed it.
        So funny that you’re reminiscing about you mother reading to you and your brother. I just sent my mother a postcard with an illustration from Wind in the Willows. My mother read it to us several times and we liked it so much. So when I saw that postcard it brought back happy memories.
        4 on a podcast? Don sure found his true calling!

        Take care, sending hugs across the ocean!

        Liked by 3 people

      2. Clanmother says:

        Hugs coming back!!!

        Like

      3. Elisabeth, TheWind in the Willows was one of my mother’s favorite childhood books. I remember so clearly her delight in introducing it to me. And of course I loved it just as much as she did!

        Liked by 2 people

  3. Dave Astor says:

    A wonderful conversation from a family of avid readers! I’m VERY impressed with the number of books the three of you (and nephew) have read and will be reading, and with the multifaceted conversation about the particular importance of reading during a pandemic that has isolated many people, the future of reading that is expected to be more interactive, and more.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      I’m delighted that you listened in, Dave! We are unable to meet together in person according to our current Covid19 protocol, so your podcast with Elisabeth Van Der Meer, opened the door for Sarah, Frances and me to try the three way conversation. These past few months have been instructive in how we access information across the internet channels. Universities, libraries, museums and new agencies are scrambling to find ways to engage students, readers and an audience. I am amazed by the breadth and depth of “vetted” information that comes from science, the arts, books, courses, all of which are efficiently delivered with a much lower cost. It will be interesting to see how technology progresses to allow for more interactive dialogue. I keep on thinking of Fahrenheit 451 and all the screens. YIKES!!!!

      Liked by 5 people

  4. Enjoyed hearing you talk about reading with your sister and mom, Rebecca! My sister and I communicate on a daily basis, and what we’re reading is often an area of focus. She started out as a more avid reader and still reads faster than I do, but we give each other ideas for books we might like. Makes reading all that much more fun:)

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      I am delighted that you listened in, Becky. Your comments and presence are very much appreciated, especially that you and your sister (I think your sister’s name is Terri) have lively conversations about books. What better subject to discuss. I enjoy following your blog and am grateful that you write children’s stories that encourage children to begin their reading journey.

      Liked by 5 people

      1. Thanks, Rebecca! Yes, my sister is Terri, and she’s really the one who got me interested in reading. She was a good role model when we were growing up, and years later she often told me about books she thought I might like:)

        Liked by 2 people

  5. It is lovely to meet your mom and sister, Rebecca. They are both lovely and so interesting. I enjoyed your mom’s comments about travelling by books. Books are a wonderful way to learn new things and to travel to other places. One of the main benefits of reading for children is that they are exposed to other cultures, traditions, and religions which encourages acceptance of diversity. This applies to us all, of course. Your sister sounds a bit like me. I also read very fast and get through a lot of books. I am not a big fantasy person though, I love family drama which is why I am drawn to classics. I have started listening to A Gentleman in Moscow and am two hours in. So far I am enjoying it very much.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      I am delighted that you are reading A Gentleman in Moscow. Don and I listened to the audiobook together. A book can be read so many ways – individually, with another person or in a group. I remember Frances reading Mutiny on the Bounty by Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall, to me when I was around 15. It was required reading and I was having difficulty with the realism. Then a few years later, I was able to read “Pitcairn’s Island” because I learned how to handle the difficult portions of Mutiny on the Bounty. You continue to inspire me with your commitment to literacy for all, Robbie. It is the most generous of gifts to receive. By the way, you and Sarah do have much in common!!!!

      Liked by 5 people

      1. I thought we did when I listened to Sarah speaking, Rebecca. Mutiny on the Bounty – I remember that book – I also read it as a teen. I may need to revisit it now!

        Liked by 4 people

  6. Paul Andruss says:

    Thanks for another thought provoking conversation.
    It was interesting to hear your mom’s take on reading at her age. Both the limitations age brings and how reading provides a window on the world when one is not able to get round as much- for a variety of reasons.
    I agree with you and Sarah re the development of the interactive novel especially through gaming which provides the emotional involvment of the novel (often lacking in movies) with the visual qualities of the movie.
    I too wonder if the novel will survive in its current form. I doubt it. The novel has evolved ever since its inception in ancient Egypt. As you said Rebecca even early 20th century novels were much more descriptive, and often meandering, compared to today’s books. Probably because out ability to paint scenes in our visual imagination has developed due to exposure to movies. It is more action focused – we can build out own sets and character depictions. It will be interesting to see how gaming takes both the written and motion picture arts forward especially with the things you highlighted in the conversation such as virtual reality.

    Liked by 6 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      You have made excellent points, Paul! Over the past decades, I realize how my reading habits have changed and focused on the bare essentials. For example a news article will only grab my attention with a headline and a few paragraphs. I have noticed that journalists have modified their writing to include the pertinent points in the beginning paragraphs, allowing the reader to decide whether to continue to a more detailed account in the remaining paragraphs. Photography has also added much to storylines now that photographers are using cameras to tell a story. As you said, we are filling out the sets and character depictions. As you know, I have a creator license under Epidemic Sound. Much of their music can be used in games and video shorts. Reading will become even more important in the coming decades. As Frances said, she was excited to be part of this Zoom conversation, considering that her family had no access to a telephone when she was a child. It is an exciting prospect and I am excited to see where this journey takes us. Sending many hugs!

      Liked by 5 people

  7. Ms Frances says:

    This (Zoom) is a new and wonderful way to communicate, and this conversation was very exciting to me. I am looking forward to other conversations like this. This conversation about books and the reading of them has encouraged me for the next years of reading together. Reading together has been encouraging to me too, because doing things together is more fun and encouraging. Bravo for next year! ! !

    Liked by 7 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      Thank you Frances, for joining Sarah and I on this podcast. I remember the day that we received the Children’s Encyclopedia Britannia. Dad put up the shelves and we started on the first volume (I think there was 12 columns) which was all about poetry. Encyclopedia Britannica has just published an updated version in book format, but it is only one column and pertains to science. https://books.britannica.com/us-britannica-all-new-kids-encyclopedia/. The poetry and stories are now all on line. How far we have come. Looking forward to continuing the 2021 Family Book Challenge. Hugs and love!

      Liked by 5 people

      1. Ms Frances says:

        Yes, I remember the Childrens Encyclopedia Britannica! Your father was a fantastic leader in reading. We were blest by his presence and encouragement.

        Liked by 6 people

    2. At the end of her life, my mother was very keen on my reading the same books she did so that we could discuss them together.

      Liked by 2 people

  8. Mary Jo Malo says:

    Sitting down with a warm beverage to listen to one of your podcasts, especially with the Trio, is a comforting experience. No matter what the future brings with its ‘novel’ formats, nothing beats the experience of real human beings discussing the joys of reading and listening to stories. Serious competitors enjoy challenging themselves more than one another, but there are so many facets to a reading challenge besides the number of books read. I never get upset with myself over the count, especially if I’ve tried other genres or read longer and more difficult works. Rebecca, you’ve probably already encountered how reading the classics typically requires more immersion than popular fiction. And like Frances also says, all stories can be enjoyable. Sarah is a brave soul in that she is so adventurous and willing to embrace the brave new worlds of reading experience. I’m too intrepid for that! Thank you again, ladies, for a delightful and inviting conversation. The laughs are tangible too. Hugs times three.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      Sarah has always been the brave one of us, Mary Jo! Ever since her arrival when I was 8 years old, she was ready to take on something new. Even now, when she is dealing with a broken foot. Yes, you read right. Sarah is now sporting a fashionable boot on her leg that is helping the healing process. You might well imagine this is a perfect time for her to read. I have never heard one complaint from her about this unfortunate occurrence. I would be more apt to howl at the moon! One of the new additions to the book challenge is to have someone recommend a book to another participant. My recommendation to Sarah was to read Circe by Madeline Millar. She loved it and now Frances is reading it. Sarah and I are now reading Madeline Millar’s, The Song of Achilles, which is based on the Iliad. I would heartily recommend Circe – and would appreciate your thoughts on Madeline Millar’s writing. Sending many hugs back!

      Liked by 5 people

      1. Mary Jo Malo says:

        Sarah is amazing indeed! About this time last year I was healing from a broken leg, remember? Lots of reading continues, and I will definitely add these to my TBR list.

        Liked by 4 people

      2. Clanmother says:

        I do remember that you were healing from a broken leg. And I never heard a word of complaint from you. I would have howled!!!! Hugs! Looking forward to your thoughts on Circe!

        Liked by 3 people

      3. Mary Jo Malo says:

        But we NEED our sensitives as much as our stoics. 🤗🤗🤗

        Liked by 3 people

      4. Clanmother says:

        🤗🤗🤗😅😅😅

        Liked by 2 people

  9. Klausbernd says:

    Thank you very much for sharing your love of books. With the relatively new technology, you open up the individual reading to an event including many. Reading is an isolating process and it needs the de-isolation. For me, it was writing that includes lecture tours. I am an old fashion reader of the classics I still can enjoy Joyce, Proust, Goethe and Th. Mann. On the other hand, I enjoy post-modern texts, texts that reflect how they are made and show that they are artefacts.
    The next time you come together for a podcast I would like to know which book you have read and how your experience was reading this book.
    Dear Sarah, I really liked what you said about competition. I agree and think that competition kills creativity.
    It was great to listen to your talk and Don did a brilliant job again.
    Many hugs from the little village next to the big sea
    Klausbernd 🙂

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      Dear Klausbernd, your brilliant thought “reading is an isolating process and it needs the de-isolation” resonates with my experience. Reading allows me to connect with the writer through words and images that are formed from the story. The turn of phrase, the description of climate and landscape, the conversations between characters become part of my story. Books challenge my preconceived views and give me the benefit of seeing a wider horizon. This horizon is made even wider when I connect with others – the de-isolation process. I just spoke with Sarah, who wanted me to extend her thanks to you. She will be delighted, as Frances and I am, to share the books and experiences ow 2021. Thanks you for listening in and for your heartwarming comments. Don sends he thanks along with mine. Many hugs and love come to our dear friends, The Fab Four of Cley.

      Liked by 4 people

      1. Klausbernd says:

        Dear Rebecca,
        I have sent you an email with some ideas about sharing our reading experiences. That’s a great idea I really like.
        Greetings to Sarah and your mother and many hugs to you, Don and Thomas
        Klausbernd 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    2. Klausbernd, if you enjoy metafiction, I can recommend Love: A Story by Bill Smoot, which I recently read.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Klausbernd says:

        Dear Liz,
        THANKS A LOT. I just ordered Bill Smoot’s “Love: A Story”. I am really looking forward reading it. I read some reviews and it seems the kind of book I really like.
        Thanks again and have a happy week to come
        Klausbernd 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

      2. I’m so glad to hear it, Klausernd! I’d love to know what you think of it.

        Liked by 2 people

      3. Klausbernd says:

        Although I ordered it from amazon is hasn’t arrived yet. So I started a Swedish novel by Helene Tursten “Snödrev”. When I have finished this I will start “Love: A Story” by Bill Smooth.
        Bye, bye, now we will vanish in our sauna and enjoy sweating.

        Liked by 2 people

      4. Clanmother says:

        Have fun vanishing into your sauna. I just found “Snow Drift” by Helene Tursten. Is that the book you are reading?

        Like

      5. Bye, bye! No sweating for me, just resting up for another day of meetings.

        Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply to Dave Astor Cancel reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.