Season 2 Episode 53: Sisters Unscripted on The Book Dialogue

“For there is no friend like a sister
In calm or stormy weather;
To cheer one on the tedious way,
To fetch one if one goes astray,
To lift one if one totters down,
To strengthen whilst one stands.”

Christina Rossetti, Goblin Market and Other Poems

Welcome to Tea Toast & Trivia.

Thank you for listening in.

Much to the chagrin of my father, over 500 Harlequin romances were delivered to our doorstep in the early 1970’s, a gift from an uncle who owned a bookstore and had a delicious sense of humour. My sister, Sarah, and I were delighted by the stack of 1950’s and 1960’s romances with such names, if I remember correctly, as “A Promise is for Keeping,”  and “A Song to be Sung”.  Soon the marathon was underway, even as my father tempted us with non-fiction books strategically placed around our home.

Sarah has always been a voracious reader, moving from genre to genre with a dexterity that leaves me breathless. While I followed my father’s footsteps into non-fiction, she embraced fiction from sci-fi to fantasy to historical to romance.

And then quite suddenly, the trajectory of our reading changed. I have rediscovered the marvelous world of fiction and Sarah has made a pivotal foray into the non-fiction arena.

Sarah and I discuss our reading experiences in “The Book Dialogue” podcast, an unscripted discussion of books we love, hosted by Sarah. 

Tea Toast & Trivia is pleased to present an upcoming podcast scheduled to be published on The Book Dialogue.

Until next time, dear listeners, keep safe and be well.

Elizabeth Gauffreau Reading Telling Sonny Tea. Toast. & Trivia.

  1. Elizabeth Gauffreau Reading Telling Sonny
  2. Dave Astor on Comics, Cartoons & Confessions
  3. Teagan Geneviene Reading Hullaba Lulu
  4. Resa McConaghy on Glamour, Fantasy & Art
  5. Paul Andruss on Myths, Travel, Language & Writing

19 Comments Add yours

  1. nickreeves says:

    Wonderfully put together. A super listen with poached eggs and coffee on a late October morning. Thank you both!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      I am delighted that you joined us, Nick! Sarah keeps me focused – I have to run to keep up with her. But the one that Sarah and I have never kept up with is our mother, Frances. YIKES! We have tried for decades and still she eludes our grasp. She is always around the next corner. So glad that we connected!

      Liked by 3 people

      1. nickreeves says:

        🙂
        A clan of clan mothers!
        Again, I really enjoy your shows.

        Liked by 2 people

  2. Klausbernd says:

    Dear sisters,
    thanks a lot for this great book dialogue.
    I am somebody who changed from non-fiction reading and writing to fiction reading and writing. As I read a lot I keep a so-called book-diary. In this diary, I write five to max. ten sentences about every book I have read, mostly about the style, the plot-design and the narrative perspective (I am especially interested in). Also I write comments in the book I am reading. That helps me to be able to remember this book quite well when I want to talk or write about it later.
    Mythology: There is hardly any plot in literature that doesn’t go back to mythology. For me, mythology is the architecture of all narratives.
    Wishing you two all the best from the little village next to the big sea
    Klausbernd 🙂 and
    Tha Fab Four of Cley
    🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      Dear Klausbernd – the book diary is a brilliant idea. Today, I am heading out to find a “book diary” which I will use to write my thoughts on each book I read. I confess that I have never thought about keeping a book diary. Sarah does keep record, which is why she is able to retain her thoughts and is able to discuss the plot and how she felt about reading the book months after she closed the book. I am excited about this new project. Your thoughts on mythology would be exceptionally interesting. Do you think a podcast would be a good place to discuss mythology in literature? I enjoyed “Circe” for I identified with the underlying thoughts on life, death, endurance, risk, deceit, redemption – things that we experience in reality. Sarah sends her many thanks along with mine. Sending hugs and much love to my dear friends, The Fab Four of Cley!🤗🤗🤗🤗

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Klausbernd says:

        Deasr Rebecca
        That’s really GREAT to hear that I could inspire you. Two more advantages of a book diary are that you will remember much better what you wrote down and in writing down your ideas you’ll see if you undertstood this book.
        “Circe” is, by the way, the name of my boat. That’s sleeping on land right now.
        I will think about your mythology idea.
        With lots of love and hugs
        Klausbernd and the rest of the gang

        Liked by 2 people

  3. Ms Frances says:

    This is a really fun discussion. I was glad to see it on this “paper”. I have heard it elsewhere but am delighted to find the discussion here, as well. I hope there will be others who find this worthwhile podcast. You have other discussions that are really worthwhile. I wish you every success as you review and discuss a variety of books– fiction, history, and of course, educational! Thank you for sharing this! ! !

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      I am delighted that you are following my paper, The OTR Bookclub Daily”!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Ms Frances says:

    This is a delightful discussion, I really enjoyed it. I also found this on the paper and commented there. I am hoping the introduction there will encourage others to joint your podcast. It is really interesting and inspiring. Thank you for taking the time to produce this valuable discussion. I wish you many more interested listeners.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Clanmother says:

      Sarah is so busy these days with her business and now taking her MBA. I’m honoured that she asks me to contribute to these wonderful podcasts.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. What intrigues me most about mythology is archetypal stories that transcend place, time, and culture. Every time I encounter one in fiction or poetry, whether it’s direct or just a faint echo, I get a little thrill of connection with all of those other minds. Thank you for a very enjoyable conversation that prompted this line of thought!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      Thank you so much for your support and encouragement of these discussions. The idea of Circe going into solitude, banished to an island, was analogous to the pandemic destruction within my reality. A serendipitous read! I remember the first time I read “The Count of Monte Cristo” which was during math class (book within book strategy). I was horrified that he had spent so much time incarcerated and was relieved when he found someone to share his time. I am so glad that you listened in – so very much appreciated. Hugs

      Liked by 2 people

      1. It was my pleasure to listen in. I greatly enjoy your conversations with Sarah. I should have tried the book-within-a-book strategy for algebra and geometry classes in high school. I tried to go to sleep but still keep my eyes open.

        Liked by 2 people

  6. Paul Andruss says:

    Another sparkling eclectic discussion – this is the real gift of social media, that ordinary folk can speak and be listened too amid the hysterical babble of main stream media.
    Starting with a quote from Christina Rossetti, left me anticipating the conversation even before I started listening to it. A very undervalued family. Imagine what she and her brother William would have done with podcasts and Dante with DeviantArt.
    As an aside Russ worked on Great Pulteney St in Soho and at the end of the street is a little blue plague commemorating Polidori (her mum was his sister) at the other end is a pub (I think the Sun (& 7 cantons?)) where the actor John Hurt could be found propping up the bar (according to legend he lived above the pub) while around the corner, at the bottom of carnaby St there is another blue plague a post office building saying it was the site of William Blake’s house.
    Funnily enough I have just got the Song on Achilles and am now very much looking forward ot it. You gave some lovely quotes from Circe – it sounds an impressive work. I particularly liked your own quote to whit- humans having the gift of death & your sister’s discussion on mythology and the modern religion of empirical science. Someone once said to me. Everyone is the hero of their own life which very much fits in what you guys were saying.
    Finally give my regards of Helios. We don’t see him much round these parts anymore. Pxx.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Clanmother says:

      Oh, the power of conversations. With so many talented “Rossetti” children, I have often imagined what it would be like to be at the Rossetti dinner table. The family history reads like a novel doesn’t it? So pleased you brought up the name Polidori!!! I am especially interested in the “grandfather” – Gaetano Polidori who was an Italian writer, translator and scholar. He set up his private press and printed the first editions of some poems by Dante and Christina. So many many stories held safe in the folds of history. I would be interested in your thoughts on Song of Achilles. Circe was an amazing narrative, which came just at the right time for me to read. As you and I have discussed, serendipity or the “universe” brings things to us, often is very unusual ways. There is humour around us!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Mary Jo Malo says:

    These conversations between sisters are always so delightful. That you’re discussing books is doubly so. What strikes me as a wonderful irony, is that being fully human is what’s truly heroic. Walk the earth, step outside our safe confines, don’t be defeated by set backs, and live fully!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Clanmother says:

      You have such a beautiful way with words, Mary Jo. “Being fully human is what’s truly heroic.” To enjoy the life that is given, to gives thanks for the days that come, and the people who add sunshine and laughter.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Resa says:

    This is a fab idea for podcasts.
    You 2 sisters are absolutely great together!
    I have some other sister experiences. What could one expect with 4 sisters, 2 who are/were mentally ill?
    Nonetheless, I love all my sisters.
    It’s so much fun listening to the 2 of you, together!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Clanmother says:

      I am so glad that you listened in, Resa! Sarah is an wonderful sister who keeps me focused and thinking. That is what sisters are all about. You are always welcomed in our family. Hugs!!!!

      Liked by 1 person

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