Season 2 Episode 41: The Art of Romance with Shehanne Moore

“If her body was fed to the crows in one-inch pieces, before her eyes and all she needed to do to stop it was kiss him, she’d sooner the crows didn’t go hungry.”

Shehanne Moore,  The Unraveling of Lady Fury  

Welcome to Tea, Toast and Trivia.

Thank you for listening in.

I am travelling approximately 8,000 kilometres from Vancouver to Broughty Ferry, Scotland,  Dundee’s Historic Seaside Village, to meet up with my friend and Shehanne Moore, the writer who has given us the exciting historical romance, “The Unraveling of Lady Fury.”

When not cuddling inn signs in her beloved Scottish mountains alongside Mr. Shey, or spending time with their family, Shehanne Moore writes dark and smexy historical romance, featuring bad boys who need a bad girl to sort them out.

Put the kettle on and join in the conversation.  We would love to hear your thoughts on Tea Toast & Trivia.

I am your host Rebecca Budd and I am looking forward to sharing this moment with you.

Thank you for joining Shehanne and me on Tea Toast & Trivia. And a very special thank you and shout out to Shehanne.  I invite your to meet up with Shehanne on her blog, Shehanne Moore . Be warned, you are only an internet click away from being swept away in a daring adventure.

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77 Comments Add yours

  1. Rebecca, my lovely Clansister, this is amazing. I cannot thank you and Don enough for your time, your input, your work xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      Thank you for a wonderful conversation, Shehanne! Your joy and enthusiasm is a great way to start my day. Don and I had a wonderful time meeting up with you. The 8,000 kilometer distance seemed non-existent. It was like you were in the same room. Looking forward to a return visit. Take care and many hugs come with my gratitude for sharing your insights.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. It was wonderful to talk to you. Surely you were right there at my kitchen table is how I felt chatting away. All love to you and Don for this and I am up for more toast any time xxxx

        Liked by 3 people

      2. Clanmother says:

        Love your kitchen table🤗🤗🤗

        Liked by 2 people

  2. I left you a comment saying xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx and xxxxxxxxxxxxxxand bnigger logner xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx or wpords to that affect but I dunno if it got chewed. A lot of probs on here last few days.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. An interesting interview. Ms. Shehanne highlights it up with the remarks “we are all products of our experience in life, of our upbringing, our hopes, our dreams, our failures, our mistakes, our needs, fears, everything…” Both fiction and non-fiction are really necessary as multiple sources, but I admit, in the course of my research for writing facts and truth, I got stuck up with non-fiction. Besides the classics, amongst the many romance/adventures I read long time ago, Love’s Tender Fury by Jennifer Wilde (only the 1st of the trilogy) crossed my mind now… Guess I must try Ms. Shehanne’s books now for a restart. Thanks for sharing your podcasts. Jo

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      Many years ago, my uncle gifted Sarah, my sister, and me over 500 Harlequin Romances, much to my father’s chagrin. Dad was a firm believer in non-fiction. As teenagers, Sarah and I enjoyed those books. Sarah, being a voracious reader, read 5 to my 1 book, by I digress. Over the years, I transitioned to non-fiction. Biographies and histories books were more exciting to me because they were “real.” Sarah remained with fiction. Now the tables have turned, with Sarah moving to non-fiction and I have come back to fiction. The other day when we were having tea, Frances, my mother, remarked on the gift of books, the gift of writers. Books are there when you need them. They come at the right time. Shehanne believes that every one, while flawed, deserves redemption. And that gives me comfort. Thank you so much for listening in, Jo! Hugs to you and Carina! Take care.

      Liked by 3 people

    2. Ah Jennifer Wilde whose books I have here under the name Beatrice Parker–some of them anyway. Thank YOU for, not just coming by but listening and commenting. We also need non fiction when it comes to facts, That’s the backdrop, the props table for the greater play, human love, failings devotion. For me anyway. Bring that out an you have your story, x

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Thank you. My best wishes in your future endeavors. Jo

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Mary Jo Malo says:

    So interesting to hear writers speaking about their craft…and with such a lovely accent! Whenever a creative person explains their personal philosophy and how it informs their work, I always pay attention. The journeys of writer and reader intersect in unexpected ways, and as you say, novels defy time and space. Lovely interview, Rebecca, always so positive!!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      I agree wholeheartedly, Mary Jo. When I know the background and personal values and ideas of an artist, writer or poet, their art, books, poetry became more real, more vibrant. This understanding brings clarity and greater understanding. A few years ago, I started to read Virginia Wolf’s “To the Lighthouse.” I had never read any of her books (gasp!!) and thought it was time to see what all of the acclaim was all about. I read a few chapters and then set it aside, knowing that I would never fully engage with Virginia Wolf’s writing unless I read more about her. The time has come to revisit Virginia Wolf and I have started to read her biography. I am grateful that I stopped reading, To the Lighthouse. Will keep in touch on the project – it will take a while because I want to savor the moments. So glad you listened in – Shehanne is an absolute joy.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Clansister to me xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx YOu are the joy in every way xx

        Liked by 2 people

    2. Mary Jo, here was me thinking that accent is awful, next time you either need to learn to ‘shut it’, or speak without it, so thank you. So long as I didn’t bore on for my work then that work is done for me. When Rebecca said what she did re novels and time and space the nicest chills shot up my spine because that is true. Thank you so much for taking the time to listen xx

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Mary Jo Malo says:

        You are most welcome!

        Liked by 3 people

  5. Jean-Jacques says:

    Save for the thought of her body being fed to my friends the crows in one-inch pieces, I’ve no doubt lovely Shehanne Moore’s The Unraveling of Lady Fury, will be a fascinating read. Actually as the old saying goes ‘ looks can be deceiving ‘ for it’s hard to believe how such a lovely looking lady can write such dark and gory sounding stories. Regardless It does sound enticing, so reading the book will have to suffice. Enjoyed the interview, Rebecca!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      I thought of you when I read this quote about our dear friends the crows!! Shehanne has a marvelous sense of humour and joy for life. She loves history, completes meticulous research for her historical novels, and believes her character, while flawed, deserve a second chance. The idea of working with storyboards was brilliant, which prompted me to consider, do we create storyboards for our lives….another discussion in the making. Thanks for listening in, Jean-Jacques – very much appreciated.

      Liked by 2 people

    2. Jean-Jacques, give me time here..as in when the lovely Rebecca signs herself up to continue this conversation and I am sure I will get to how kind you are and how I am sure I could NOT possibly write a dark or gory thing in my life. (Maybe the capitals should have been on the ‘possibly’… ) Thank you so much for listening and commenting. Rebecca read that extract so amazingly I got nice chills up my spine. What a voice she has.

      Liked by 2 people

  6. Jean-Jacques says:

    Storyboards, has the makings of lawyer’s mind, being somewhat familiar with that profession. Brilliant and effective for sure, though having the heart and mind of a supposed poet and tested romantic, save having known the many years experience of a business man, I prefer the freedom of spontaneity and ion the spot surfacing ideas, rather than unreliable long term planing.
    Chacun son goût, n’es pas…?

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      This is a great conversation, Jean-Jacques. Freedom of spontaneity vs Strategic planning. Et la vie continue!

      Liked by 2 people

    2. Jean-Jacques, for many years I had bills to pay hence the storyboards in terms of a job. Even then as I sat down to create the however many it was per script I had no idea where I was going next and always just hoped to get to the end. To this day I have never been able to plot a thing I’ve written, just get out on the tightrope with the balancing pole in my hands and hope for the best, especially when my characters throw entire books like squibs into a bonfire. . Spontaneity is everything. x

      Liked by 2 people

  7. Ms Frances says:

    This is another interesting conversation. I appreciated the happy laughter connected with the words, it seemed to me to give a certain lightness to the more serious comments. I appreciated her respect for the personalities of her characters–flawed but also a certain dept of character came through, I found. It would seem that she writes, at least in some, using dark spaces. It seems a bit our of her character, so I am encouraged to read her stories, next on my list! !

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      I am so glad that you enjoyed this conversation, Frances. I was very excited that Shehanne and I were able to connect across the continent and an ocean. It seems that books connect us across time and location in mysterious ways! I often wonder what writers would think if they knew that we were still reading and enjoying their work centuries after their passing! I think of Marcus Aurelius writing to himself. And here is one of his thoughts that remain even through the translations: “Never let the future disturb you. You will meet it, if you have to, with the same weapons of reason which today arm you against the present.”

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Ms Frances says:

        I just listened to this conversation again when it came on my Facebook–delightful! ! ! It is interesting that you should mention Marcus Aurelius, one of my favorite historical figures. Yes, I think they would be delighted to know that we are enjoying their writings so many centuries later.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Clanmother says:

        Thank you for you lovely comments, Frances. Always appreciate your thoughts.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. I, too, often wonder what writers from the past would think if they knew how readers well into the distant future are reading and responding to their works.

        Liked by 2 people

  8. Dave Astor says:

    A fascinating and wide-ranging conversation, Rebecca and Shehanne!

    So many highlights — your beginnings as a writer, Shehanne; how difficult it (usually) is to write and be published; your emphasis on (complex) characters, with plot to follow; your use of cliffhangers; your background in comic strips (a field I wrote about for many years); the importance of family; and your general enthusiasm!

    And, Rebecca, I loved your remark about how a writer and readers “meet” through a book even though they might never meet in person, or even live in the same century.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      I am delighted that you joined the conversation, Dave. You continue to be the inspiration for me to look into fiction again. I just found the book “A Quiet Life in the Country” by T.E. Kinsey. It is the first book in the Lady Hardcastle Mysteries. This is a BIG step for me because I haven’t read a mystery book since I was a teenager. If you had told me a year ago that I would be reading a mystery, let alone a mystery that was part of a series, I would not have believed you. YIKES. We can still grow, learn and surprise ourselves. Thank you!!!

      Liked by 2 people

  9. Dave that is so kind. For many reasons. The fact you have been involved in this industry too for a long time and have a great love of literature, most of all. Rebecca did an amazing job in every way. Just an honour to be here. And I also love that remark about how a writer and a reader meet through a book, regardless. Thank you for reading and commenting.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      By the way, Dave and Shehanne, Don is working on a new method to bring out a better audio. We are having so much fun. Thank you for your support and encouragement!!!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank YOU for all yours. Thank Don too. You’re both amazing,

        Liked by 2 people

  10. A delightful conversation, Rebecca and Shehanne. I haven’t read a historical romance for years, but this one sounds really intriguing and after seeing the five star reviews on Amazon, especially one which said, “Take your mind off the world’s misfortunes, and instead, focus on those of our heroine and the creative ways she manages to extricate herself from all of them,” I just couldn’t resist. I look forward to reading all about the ‘unravelling of Lady Fury’. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      Thank you for listening in to our conversation. I confess that I have just come back to reading fiction, Sylvia. And it is good to be back. Recently, I read two versions of how “Doctor Zhivago” was smuggled out of Russia: one fiction and one non-fiction. While both were excellent reads, it was the fiction that allowed me to feel and experience the events as they unfolded. What remains clear in my memory was the account via fiction. Mark Twain said it best: “The difference between fiction and nonfiction is that fiction must be absolutely believable.” Shehanne completes meticulous research for her historical novels which adds to the drama. Sending hugs your way.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Rebecca xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx you Fiction does have to be believable, even when you are writing something that seems impossible, I reckon it is a writer’s job to believe so that they make the reader believe too.

        Liked by 2 people

    2. That is so kind of you. Thank YOU so SO much. I loved every second of chatting to Rebecca. She has this way making you feel at home. it was as if she was sitting there in my kitchen piring the tea. Lovely to meet you x

      Liked by 4 people

      1. She is so amazing. I’ve done a couple of “Tea and Toasts” with her and enjoyed every second of our time together. 😃

        Liked by 3 people

      2. Clanmother says:

        And I am looking forward to our next podcast together, Sylvia!!! Hugs!

        Liked by 2 people

  11. Resa says:

    Best Podcast…. EVER!
    Rebecca and Shey, you have done brilliantly.
    I consider myself a true fan of Shey’s novels. I have 2 books of Shey’s remaining, to read. The next will be “His Judas Bride”. UNLESS, Shey finishes her new book, which I am biting at the quick to read.
    Of course, as an Art Gowns Model, Shey will always be on the pages of Art Gowns, no matter when or how much she writes. I feel I have finally got her down, in my drawings, in the way I express my models.
    Rebecca, you know I adore your voice, when you read poetry or a few lines of “The Unravelling of Lady Fury”.
    Now, I have heard Shey’s voice. She is a lark, and I am so happy!
    Rebecca, may I suggest “O’Roarke’s Destiny”, for your next read of Shey’s.
    1930’s or40’s?You go Shey!!!
    This is one exciting writer!!! YES! Have her back, Rebecca!

    Love and Hugs to both of you,
    Resa

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      Resa – you were the one who introduced me to Shey as one of your brilliant, savvy and courageous models on Art Gowns. I love the term ‘smexy’ which defines a whole new romance genre. Shey’s laughter is pure sunshine! Thank you for the introduction and for sharing your creativity with the world. Hugs and love!!!

      Liked by 2 people

    2. I’ve listened to some of those. And I loved them. bring on the tea and the toast with Rebecca. She is the best

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Resa says:

        It was so great hearing your voice Shey! I love it!!! You sound like a fairy! I adore Rebecca’s podcasts, and all her blogs!
        In the next adventure of PBH and the Art Gowns Models, when I do the flower dresses, Rebecca will be the Art Director. I need to draw her… in my way.
        FIRST… the new Art Gown. I’m basically finished it. I’m doing the Mini-Me’s out fit, now, and cleaning up the Gown room, and dealing with the plants, etc. setting the stage…if you will. Then I can shoot it! Very excited! xoxoxoxo

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Clanmother says:

        You are the best, Resa! Looking forward and resting up for the next adventure. Can hardly wait.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. And you will draw her beautifully too. A simple line and you will have her. Can’t wait xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx You’re so kind about my voice.

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Resa!! The other day my younger girl was looking at the big pciture of the ladies with their names underneath, including my own. She never had her specs on but she pointed right at it and went’, ‘That is so like you.’ So I said that is me. And again she said, ‘ That is amazing. I have seen you with your hair like that and if you had a dress like that, this is how you would look.’ I went, ‘What do yah mean dress? These are gowns.’ So you more than have me. There you go. Thank you for this. Gosh, it is high praise indeed. Tearing into Wryson’s Eternity as we speak xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx And Rebecca’s voice is the msot beautiful, classy, paced, warm, amazing.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Resa says:

      Agree about Rebecca’s voice! Have you heard her recite poetry, or read a passage? It’s the best.
      SO, Wryson’s Eternity… After the new Art Gown (it took 6 months to make it…needle in, needle out!) I’ll begin drawing the flower Art Gowns. Of course it takes time to draw you all… and begin to concoct a story, but I’m hoping there will be a “cover reveal”, then.
      YAY! If your daughter recognized you, I am very pleased! xoxoxo

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I have listened to her podcasts and her voice gives me thrills. I sees you have been a busy lady. I am going to look at some cover ideas very soon. My younger girl did indeed recognize me. She thought the drawing were amazing. So I told her all about how well you had captured each girl.

        Liked by 2 people

  13. Rebecca, i am so glad Resa brought us together. Both you ladies are pure sunshine xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx And so so very talented.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Resa says:

      xoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxo

      Liked by 1 person

  14. cath says:

    How lovely to hear the voice behind the voice! Great interview. What a journey you’ve had, and some lovely insights into writing. xx

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      I am so pleased that you listened in, Cath. Shehanne has a wonderful way of telling a story. I enjoy following her blog and reading about other writers. The writing community has an amazing support system that share knowledge, experience and wisdom.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. The writing community is the best. it has brought me people like you, like Cath, Resa, you name it. Such a joy to know.

        Liked by 2 people

    2. Some journeys are just longer than others you know. But it does no harm to make them. How lovely to see you xxxxxxxxxxxxx

      Liked by 2 people

  15. What a wonderful interview. Enjoyed it with a coffee. Shey is just the most super talented writer and one top person as well.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      I am delighted that you joined the conversation, and look forward to our ongoing discussion. As I write this, I’m having my morning coffee in Vancouver, which is another wonderful way to share a great conversation. Shey had a zest for life that inspires us all. Her laughter, humour and generosity comes through her words, whether written or spoken. She has promised to come back!!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Gary, thank you so so much for this. You’re very kind. I tried to enjoy my coffee this morning but the younger grandie demanded my chocolate. What could i do but hand it over?

        Liked by 2 people

      2. I defo will. I don’t go away very easily! Like Gary, you’re very kind. I was telling him about your Yorkshire blog. He lives there in a lovely village. Every Sunday he also does a Swiss Sunday post. The pics are fabulous.

        Liked by 2 people

  16. I greatly enjoyed listening to your interview with Shehanne! I got such a kick out of her first story being set in a whorehouse, and she didn’t know what a whorehouse was. I have sometimes wondered how many writers keep their junvenalia. A compilation of these would make for an interesting anthology.

    I was also very interested in Shehanne’s comments about establishing her own publishing imprint, as I am thinking about doing that as well.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      What a great thought about a compilation of early writings. I never thought of that. Think of all the creative writing that is completed during grade school, high school and university. Please keep me updated on the progress of establishing your publishing imprint. I think this is an excellent idea!!!

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Thank you for the encouragement, Rebecca!

        Liked by 2 people

    2. I just thought the alliteration was good but I could see I was alone in that! I’d have kept the lot but we lived in a place where space was at at a premium BUT I have quite aged ‘earlies’ maybe from when I was aged 15 I never hid from bonfires. If you are thinking re your own imprint, find my blog, find the contact tab. More than happy to help

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Thank you for your generous offer of help, Shehanne! I really appreciate it.

        Liked by 1 person

  17. PS Gary, Rebecca has some wonderful, hugely reflective and inspirational blogs here…DO you know there’s even one about the North Yorkshire Railway? Not too far back either.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      Gary!! You must right the North Yorkshire Railway. It is a wonderful way to go back in time.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I shared your actual link in a comment on Gary’s blog and he replied that his son’s granddad…don’t know if it was maternal or paternal… helped set that Moors railway up. There you go. Small world indeed.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Clanmother says:

        Thank you for the introduction to Gary’s blog. I’m looking forward to following his posts and discussions. We are part of an extraordinary community that spans the globe.

        Liked by 1 person

  18. We are indeed part of a community –a worldwide one xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    Liked by 3 people

  19. PaulAndruss says:

    The whole interview was quite simply gorgeousness on toast from beginning to end.
    Beautifully set up with the intro and outro music. You, Clanmother, have a charming voice. As does Shehanne. Immensely listenable.
    I must admit at this point, I am already a massive Shehanne fan having read Splendor and The Writer and the Rake.
    For me Shehanne’s skills lie not only in her wit and skill with words, but also with her command of unconscious nuance. She easily brings to life the period through an effortlessly uncluttered style. If she was a painter she would be an impressionist- think of Monet’s waterlilies. Beneath the surface she plays with a highly literate and thoughtful subtext, in which she references askew historical elements to enrich the reading experience- often at an unconscious (that word again) level.
    When reading Splendor, every time I closed my eyes, the whole novel played out in my mind like a 1950s B&W British movie, nothing specific but an intangible feeling that had me thinking of stuff like Dr Syn aka the Scarecrow, The Scarlet Pimpernel and Margret Lockwood as The Wicked Lady. Stuff I hadn’t thought of for years.
    The Writer and the Rake summoned thoughts of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf- again although nothing specific, the back and forth banter between the two protagonists has a ruthlessly ascerbic ubranity- a level of controlled hysteria that just might at any moment give way to utter madness. The book starts at 100 miles an hour and never lets up until the end when you literally heave a sigh.
    Finally, with you two being writers I was expecting great conversation. You did not dissappoint, not for one second. Top notch thoughtful and eye opening observations about writing and life. Although it is a phrase often overused, you took us listeners on a journey. Thoroughly enjoyable. Thank you both. Great work.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      Thank you for your amazing and heartwarming comments Paul. I confess that Shehanne is the writer, and I am the grateful reader who benefits from your amazing ability to bring stories to life. I just found your website and am looking forward to connecting. We are on a grand adventure, Paul. I’m a great believer in journeys, storytelling and serendipity – they are the magicians that bring us all together. Many thanks for listening in and adding breadth and depth to this important conversation.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. PaulAndruss says:

        Believe me Rebecca the pleasure was all mine.Absolutely! I was spellbound by both of you. Good conversation, thoughtfulness, insights and consideration is not a dying art -despite what many of us think based on the drivel from the mainstream media- but it is rare enough for us to treasure it when we hear it and stand on the mountain top shouting Hip Hip Hurrah! I am a huge fan of human intennigence and emotional intelligence. Pxxx

        Liked by 2 people

  20. Paul, thank you so very much my friend. Your kindness has actually quite brought a tear. O remember you mailing me re Splendor and how you wanted to throw the book against the all when she loses the comp but then you thought what the hell, there be no story if she won and ten mins later were back reading it. Rebecca is amazing. As is her husband. You have to find the one where she recites Desiderata. i bookmarked it it is so powerful. Thank you again and you rebecca for your lovely comment.

    Liked by 3 people

  21. PaulAndruss says:

    Oh Shey I remember that too. It was so funny- generally I keep my cool when reading- except when its rubbish- natch!- but to read something that is engrossing and still want to throw it across the room in frustration is really a tribute to your skill. I also remember- and vividly remember it still – the scene on the dark stromy night with the broken down cart. And seeing the whole thing unroll before my eyes in black and white like a scene from David Lean’s Great Expectations. It was magical. Talka bout memories are made of this. Pxxx

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Lol…Oh my lord, that is the Clitherow ..as in that nag of a horse…will only do as Clitherow will do scene. IE nothing. I did have fun writing that bit. Lol just as well you kept reading since it was after the comp bit. And I could picture Mr O’Taggart…aka Old Stumpie, as a 1940s bit player. So yep you got me on that. I always have a muse for every character even if they are just the ‘bell boy.’ xxx again Paul, very kind.

      Liked by 3 people

  22. PaulAndruss says:

    Rebecca, Could you please leave a link to your Desiderata recitation- I tried to find it but without much luck. Thanks Paul

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      Hi Paul – I am delighted that we have connected. I first met up with the Desiderata when I was about 15 years old and it has stayed with me over the years.

      The post was February 2, 2020 just before the Covid19 disruption. Perhaps it was a foreshadowing of things to come and a reminder that hope remains ever present, even during days of uncertainty. https://ladybudd.com/2020/02/02/sunday-evening-reflection-desiderata/

      I have been reciting poetry to an empty room for several years. It has been cathartic and allows me to reflect upon things that add joy and humour to my days. Just recently, I decided to add poetry to videos. I still have much to learn about recitation and I am truly grateful for the writers and poets that I have made through his most excellent blogging community. They give encouragement and support.

      This is the link in Vimeo https://vimeo.com/388775844

      Looking forward to the conversations that are awaiting our arrival. Take care, Rebecca

      Liked by 2 people

  23. PaulAndruss says:

    Thanks Rebecca. This was beautifully read. You a wonderful voice. It carries peace and security. The poem is lovely. My favourite line is- no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should. There is not a word wasted in the whole prose poem. It is beautifully constructed and the impact on reaching the end is visceral.
    When a callow youth I came across The Desiderata as a full page ad in the Melody Maker for King Crimson’s LP Lizard. Yes I was impressed, but youth has little wisdom. The ad is included in the CD sleeve notes where is says ‘Found in Old St Paul’s Church Baltimore Dated 1692.’ I don’t know where that came from.
    Crimson’s lyricist Peter Sinfield wrote some beautiful words. Listen to Islands https://youtu.be/FPNjQ4JWr9U & the Song of the Sea Goat on his solo LP Stillusion https://youtu.be/d6M4IIMANko – set to Vivaldi’s guitar concerto)
    Sinfield writes in the ad about the poem – the above has little to do with… but it doesn’t take a whole page to say Lizard (which is wonderful incidentally) is released on… so it seemed like a nice thing to put in the space.
    It is such a pleasure meeting you too. I felt a connection from the moment I heard your voice. Paul

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      Looking forward to the adventures ahead, Paul!!

      Liked by 2 people

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