Season 2 Episode 27: The Trio on Communication

Welcome to Tea, Toast and Trivia.

Thank you for listening in.   

April 27th is “Morse Code Day”  which commemorates Samuel F.B. Morse and the Morse Code, an event that forever changed the way our world conveyed messages. The sound of the staccato taps reminds me of adventures past and the darker days of wartime when the transfer of information was critical to victory. So, it is serendipitous that I am posting a podcast on communication.

Frances, Sarah and I taped this podcast before the world entered a time of solitude. Little did we know that, once again, our global community would soon experience a challenge that would impact the way we dialogue and connect. 

The Trio

So put the kettle on and add to the conversation.  We would love to hear your thoughts on TeaToastTrivia.com

I am your host Rebecca Budd and I am looking forward to sharing this moment with you.

23 Comments

  1. Mary Jo Malo says:

    I can’t even begin to imagine how frightening the current health and economic situation would be without our current means of communication. I do hope you continue to use this technology for these wonderful podcasts, since they are so warm and inviting. I always feel present there with you, reminiscing about earlier times. I anticipate more of The Trio discussing compassionate, effective communication. Frances made me laugh out loud with her answer to the question of whether we’re any smarter now with our advanced communication methods 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      Both Sarah and I howled when mom made that statement. We were so loud that we had to delete our laughter from the podcast because it would have given listeners a jolt. Who would have known even a few weeks ago that we would be facing a global challenge that continually evolves from day to day? We are at the beginning of this narrative, and I imagine that one day in the future, we will be asked by our children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren what it was like to live through this time – just as I ask Frances what it was like to live during the 1930’s. We need to remember the stories, for this is one that will be told and retold…
      Hugs come your way with great speed!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I wouldn’t have minded a trio of howling laughter!

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Clanmother says:

        You are too kind!!! YIKES! It was loud.

        Liked by 1 person

    2. The thought of how frightening the current health and economic situation would be without our current means of communication crosses my mind on a regular basis. In particular, I think about the Spanish Influenza pandemic, over a hundred years ago now, and what that must have been like, particularly with loved ones contracting and dying of the virus on board ship or in the trenches overseas.

      I also laughed at Francis’s answer to whether we’re smarter now with our advanced communication methods. I think she’s right!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Clanmother says:

        My grandfather’s brother came home from the fields one night – it was in the 1917 – 1918 range. He didn’t feel well and went to bed. He died the next day from the Spanish Influenza. What was amazing – he was the only one in the family that contracted that disease. My grandfather felt the loss his entire life, because he (Clarence) was the “best of them.” Actually there is a ghost story that goes along with this event. The previous evening, family members saw a lady in pilgrim’s clothes walking the upstairs floor of the house. She went into each room looking for someone. The oldest sister saw the apparition the morning that Clarence died, tried to put her arms around the “pilgrim lady” and then felt her vanish into thin air. Rather than being frightened, the family felt comforted that someone was looking after their son/brother.

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      2. How odd that your great-uncle was the only member of the family to get the Spanish Influenza. It must have been a devastating blow to have him taken from them suddenly. The ghost story is quite remarkable.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Clanmother says:

        What was most interesting was a discussion that I had with my grandfather many years ago. He said his brother, Clarence, told him a few days before he passed that he was going to go on a long journey. My grandfather thought that his brother was thinking of moving farther west, but it didn’t make sense at the time. Why would he leave the homestead? It was only when Clarence passed that my grandfather understood. As William Shakespeare said so eloquently, “We are such stuff as dreams are made on, and our little life is rounded with a sleep.”

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Shakespeare might also add: “There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
        Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.”

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Clanmother says:

        Goosebumps!!!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Resa says:

    A great episode that deals with ongoing communication and communication devices. From the first party-line to the smart phone (which to add to Frances’ comment, I believe has, in some ways, made us more stupid!)
    I still enjoy listening to the radio, so I guess I live a bit in the past.
    Thank you to all 3 of you! Stay well!!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      I am with you on the radio! I remember the first transistor radio that I received as a Christmas present the year I turned nine. I never went anyway without it because it seemed that I was connected, even back then, to a wider community. Frances Sarah and I truly appreciate your visits and comments. Hugs coming your way – please take care and stay safe!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Resa says:

        You guys are awesome, and I want all of you to stay well! HUGS!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Oh, my goodness! I got my first transistor radio at about the same age. It had a leather case with a little strap. I even took the thing to bed with me! I hadn’t thought about that little radio in years.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Clanmother says:

        That’s the one I had – a leather case with a little strap. I carried that radio around with me for ages. The music came through with all the crackles that came with turning the side knob. So much fun!

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Yes, it was! Weren’t we just the coolest kids? 😉

        Liked by 1 person

  3. I greatly enjoyed this conversation, although I have arrived very late to the party. Within the past two weeks, I have just stared working with another faculty member on a new interpersonal communication course with a focus on the workplace. You’re so right about needing to be super vigilant about email messages. I have seen some really ugly email wars. I did get a kick out of Francis’s discussion of the old party lines. They were still going strong when I was growing up because they offered families a more affordable alternative to a single line.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      You are never late the the part, Liz!! 🙂 We will be needing your course in the days ahead. The workplace will come back, but there will be profound changes in how we conduct work, connect using emerging technology and adapt to AI which appears to be a candidate for exponential growth. The Covid19 is a significant disruption and will influence, social order, economic, cultural expectations. The key to thriving in this new reality will be how we communicate. The party lines are still there, but they are radically different.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Yes, I think you’re right about the disruptive force of COVID-19. The other course I’ll be working on that will be needed is critical thinking, including evaluation of the validity of claims and supporting evidence.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Mary Jo Malo says:

    I received my first transistor radio around age 15, just in time for the Beatles. What I remember most is the extremely short life span of those crummy 9 volt batteries 🙂 What’s really lovely about all these podcasts and discussions is the grace with which we accept our aging.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Clanmother says:

      I agree wholeheartedly, Mary Jo! As William Shakespeare wrote in the Merchant of Venice, “With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come.”

      Liked by 1 person

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