Episode 11: It’s All About Fashion

Welcome to Tea, Toast and Trivia.

 

 

The conversation today is about fashion.

I am joined by my sister, Sarah and my mother, Frances as we look back on how fashion has shaped our personal understanding of elegance, beauty, trends and sustainability.

So put the kettle on and listen in as we discuss sewing machines, patterns, gloves, hats and more.

I am your host, Rebecca Budd and I’m looking forward to sharing this moment with you.

About Clanmother

Blogger, Visual Storyteller, Traveler and Life-long Learner

8 Responses

  1. Thank you, Frances, Sarah and Rebecca. Listening to this conversation in charming familial ambiance was very engrossing. How true it is that deep conversations with the right people are priceless. The subject is of special interest to us since our eldest daughter is a chief fashion designer with C&A Belgium. Jo 😊

    Liked by 1 person

  2. That was fab! It’s so where I’m at in many ways.
    Well, I’m sure you’ve seen my website https://resamcconaghy.com/ So, if you ever want to do short podcasts on any of the films I’ve done, or actors I’ve worked with, let me know. I hope I don’t seem like an ego-maniac, but I like your style! I only dish good stuff, no dirt.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Dear Rebecca and Sarah, I enjoyed very much joining with you on this issue of Tea, Toast and Trivia. What a great podcast. I enjoy each offering as it is issued. Our family has profited a lot from the sewing machine and all that goes with it. The machine I learned on was one of the earliest treadle models, and how I treasure those memories. My father was impressed that my mother taught my sister and me. He remarked and chuckled day when we were looking around for a needle to do some hand sewing, that, at least, we had more than one needle. He recalled that when his mother and sisters had sewing to do they had only ONE needle. If they could not find it, they were unable to do their work. For this reason, they were very sure to keep it in a safe place. This was in the early 1900s.

    Liked by 1 person

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